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Author Topic: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown  (Read 9293 times)

Offline rabbitman

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #120 on: June 05, 2006, 09:35:00 AM »
You are a story teller extraordinaire Charlie.  Don't beat yourself up because we couldn't stir up any game during our hunting time together.  It was a pleasure just spending the time with you.  Besides, this hunt was about all of us getting together as much as trying to kill something.  Although I was one of the older guys on this hunt, I was at the bottom as far as stickbow hunting experience.  My prior hunts have been whitetails out of treestands.  The handfull I've killed have been in the 8-12 yd. range.  I sure learned alot from you, CK and Terry. Thanks Charlie!  The first evening I was with Bob Walker and we saw some game at a distance but coluldn't get close.  We did end up slinging arrows at a few bunnies but that's it.  Didn't matter, Bob's a class act and an outgoing fun loving individual.  Listening to him laugh on Curt's video says it all about Bob.  I already talked about my hunting time with CK and Terry.  I sorry we didn't have more time as I didn't get to hunt with Guru, JC, Rob or Kevin but did get to spend time with them in the evenings and during afternoon breaks.  All are unique in there own way and all fine individuals.  Can't wait to hunt with this group again and by the way...CK...don't worry about the shopping bags...what happens in Texas stays in Texas.  :bigsmyl:

Offline Charlie Lamb

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #121 on: June 05, 2006, 09:52:00 AM »
With the morning heating up, Rob and I threw our gear in the truck and headed for a spot that I'd been wanting to check.

I'd done quite well on a small pond near the entrance to the ranch during the Texas Sweat. It had always showed me javelina's and I'd taken a pretty nice hog there as well.
When Andrew and Chris Kinslow hunted it, they too had had action with Javies and Chris arrowed a hog there as well. I had high hopes for it.

Considering the heavy rain the area had received a few weeks prior to this hunt, I shouldn't have been surprised by what I found when Rob and I walked in there.
Like all the rest of the ponds I'd seen, this one was brim full as well.

I had a good idea where I wanted to look for fresh sign, so we approached the water I split off to the right and Rob went left.
I slipped along the top of the pond bank, keeping an eye open for the javies I hoped were somewhere near... it was that time of day.
As I approached the end of dam a movement off in the brush below me brought me to a hault. A lone Javelina was walking through a clearing in the cactus some 25 yards below me.
I waited until he'd gone behind some shielding brush and moved quickly forward, thinking I'd catch him coming out the other side and with luck, up toward where I waited.

I guess he had other ideas, because that was the last I saw of him.

A quick inspection of the head of the pond where the water pinched down to a point showed lots of hog sign and some javie sign in the hard packed dirt. Fresh deer tracks in the mud at the waters edge showed that most of the animals in the area were using this point to access the water and would make it a near perfect ambush spot. I went to find Rob only to find him easing toward me along the dam.

We held a quick conference and Rob headed back toward the truck while I prepared a spot  to hide during the evenings hunt.
I found the perfect location under the spreading limbs of a large tree at the waters edge, not 15 yards from the point of most sign. A steady wind blew quartering toward the far end of the pond, so I was covered in that regard.

A little work with saw and rachet pruners and I had a perfect hide out.

Now all I had to do was wait for evening. Rob met me on the walk out and we returned to the truck... and then retraced our steps to recover the rabbit I'd shot and had stashed in a dead tree on the way in. Duh!!

Back at the camp house we shared the morning's adventures with the rest of the gang and filled empty bellies with more great chow.
I was planning another siesta for the mid day hours, but like the day before, a practice session broke out.

I'd suspected that my brace height was too low and had accounted for some erratic shooting the previous day, so I twisted the string up a few turns and joined Curt and JC to pound the block target  a little while.

Now I can tell ya, that when you're shooting with those guys, you'd better be on your toes. The boys can shoot! Throw Terry Green into the mix and you'd better be having a good day or they'll leave you crying in the dust.
The minor equiptment adjustment helped me in that department and I felt I was at least holding my own when the shooting started.

It turned out that JC was having a slight equiptment malfunction himself. His arrows were going pretty close to where he wanted them to, but the arrow flight was ratty to say the least. That wouldn't do for Joe and as Curt and I retired to the air conditioning, I noticed that Joe had come back out and was busilly pounding arrows into the target.

He would find the problem in his new shooting glove and fixed it when he returned to shooting his old retired glove. That simple switch cleaned up arrow flight to it's usual lazer like performance and Joe was once again laying them in there.
That's probably a good thing for me. Joe's a drop dead great shot!
Hunt Sharp

Charlie

Offline Kevin Smith

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #122 on: June 05, 2006, 01:44:00 PM »
Well fellas, looks like I'm the last one in on the stories for one of the most memorable hunting weekends in all my 32 years (guess i was the runt of the litter eh?) First, thanks to everyone for the comments on the music, it always means alot, and I take it straight to the heart. It really keeps me going. The great thing about a hunt like this, is that everyday is different, and your constantly looking forward to what is to come, while soaking up the moment that your in. On this hunt, I got to stalk Javies for the first time, and did so four times in one morning. I got to draw on one for the first time from ten yards. The moment before i was gonna let it go, he quickly turned from broadside, to turning and staring me down. (At that moment i thought, WWCD? (What Would Curtis Do)) That was a rush. I was at full draw at that moment, and made the decision not to attempt a face shot. Needless to say, I couldn't hold it very still, and he quickly ran off after I moved a little. One thing i learned from this, is to be prepared to take the shot in the 2-3 second window that you may only have, and realize time is not always on your side. It was great being around guys that had never been to Texas, and watching ya'll soak it up. All of the stories have been great, and it took me right back. One other story that I didn't hear mention, (excuse me if it was and I overlooked it) and find it a little amusing, was when Terry, Rob, JC, Curt, and I got trapped in the ranch by a stopped train blocking the road on the way out Monday morning. I like to think it was fates way of telling us to stay at the ranch a little longer. But after many phone calls, the train engineer got word he hadn't parked his train quite right, and he moved it. We did get some smashed coin souveniers out of it though.

It was a pleasure to meet, greet, eat, hunt, and hang out with everybody on this trip. I took away new friends, good memories, a full belly........, and three rabbits, which I have to say, isn't a bad haul at all. I look forward to the next hunt I can share in with any and/or all of you. Thanks!

    :bigsmyl:
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Online Rob DiStefano

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #123 on: June 05, 2006, 06:44:00 PM »
Moderator Melt Memoirs - SUNDAY p.m. 5/28

Charlie and I drove back to the corral sendero around 6:30pm, and he dropped me off a few hundred yards from the road ridge where I'd had the most interaction with hogs.  The game plan was for me to hunt the road and ridge, hoping to ambush a hog feeding on our corn, while Charlie drove over to his newly constructed pond "blind" and maybe get a shot at a hog or javie coming down for a drink or wallow.  He'd swing back for me after dark, and that meant about 3 hours of concentrated hunting for each of us.  

I cautiously walked up to the road ridge and checked the corn we'd sprinkled out in the late morning - yep, still there, untouched.  I went under the barbed wire fence that was strung up on the South side of the sendero and slowly worked my way down that side trail I had hacked out earlier, which paralleled the roadway.  I went hundreds of yards down, past where I'd seen the last of the game on that road (the javie from that morning).  

I looked East, way up the road where I'd just been, and felt the downwind breeze in my face.  I looked to the So'West and saw the sun slowly beginning its descent - in an hour or so, game would be stirring.  Everything was in order, everything was in place for a good evening hunt.  All the pieces of this puzzle that I'd been working on since Saturday evening's hunt with Curtis had now interlocked, and the picture formed was that of a dead critter.

This was not to be.

I hunkered down behind some cacti and thorns, hidden from any sendero travelers, and patiently waited ... a half hour ... one hour ... two hours.  It was now around 8:30pm, and it was quickly getting *real* dark.  I saw no game save for quail - they were all around me, some as close as a longbow length away.  I didn't see any hogs or javies.  Where are the critters?  I didn't even see a single rabbit - unusual for this area.                    

By now it was quite dark.  Thankfully, I had accepted Charlie's offer of one of his mini headband LED flashlights, and I strapped it over my cap and began a very long, slow walk back to the main road - ever vigilant for sendero snakes; nope, didn't see any - and awaited Charlie's arrival.  The walk proved the area wasn't totally devoid of game as I spooked a lone rabbit and several deer.  I have no idea why the hogs and javies didn't show up this evening.  Charlie's story was similar and we consoled ourselves with thoughts of a good evening's meal back at the ranch house.  


EPILOGUE

I absolutely had a fabulous time!  I've never met nor hunted with a finer bunch of fellows.  The Laguna Ranch accommodations were more than I expected and the food served was a pure delight.  My sincere compliments to Jerry and crew!  Our hunting party killed two javelinas and lost one to the bush, killed a large jack rabbit and bagged somewhere in the neighborhood of two dozen or so bunnies.  While I didn't harvest a hog, javelina or jack, I had some truly memorable stalks and managed to bag a rabbit each day.  

The geography is hostile, the climate is hot, the critters are tough - I can't wait to go back!      :)
IAM ~ The only government I trust is my .45-70 ... and my 1911.

Offline Golden Hawk

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #124 on: June 05, 2006, 07:55:00 PM »
Guys I can't tell you how much I have enjoyed following you through this hunt. Your stories are filled with the very essence of what Trad Bowhunting is all about. Thank You All for including the rest of us in your adventures,and also Thank You for all your hard work to keep this site what it is.
LeRoy

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Offline Guru

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #125 on: June 05, 2006, 08:47:00 PM »
Sorry Ray,I don't know why they wouldn't work for ya bud...... Is anyone else having trouble with the video clips???

.... After presenting Bob with his Kit....I went to the target to fling a few,before I knew it I was joined at on time or another by Rob, Curtis,JC,Charlie, and finally Terry got back from his tour to let a few rip with "Hope".  Myself, JC, And Charlie ended up being out there in the heat for a couple hours......I couldn't believe I was finally getting a chance to shoot with all these guys.It's always so cool for me to shoot with other trad shooters,I could just watch for hours, nobody shoots the same, all a little different, but all good shots!!!

   JC checkin' out a found arra.....

 

Gettin' ready....

 

 


 ...Then it was time to make one last hunt Sunday afternoon.....I'd be with Curtis again!!!

....Curtis schooled me about the "Bullbat",what a cool bird! It has a  vast vocabulary,that at times sounds almost human.

.....We seperated,each taking part of the same sendero,I'd had my misfortune the evening before.I was determined to get another chance and make good on it. Big hog tracks were plentiful...

 


First encounter was with this guy....

 

Then another....

 

 Wasn't meant to be with the javi's,ended up with one more rabbit.Met up with Curtis at dark,he too had killed a couple bunnies.But no hogs or javi's for him either.We were both surprized by the lack of game movement,But what a fine afternoon!!!!
Curt } >>--->   

"I love you Daddy".......My son Cade while stump shooting  3/19/06

Offline BigRonHuntAlot

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #126 on: June 05, 2006, 08:49:00 PM »
This is one COOL thread... Thanks Guys
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Offline Jumper

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #127 on: June 05, 2006, 10:17:00 PM »
Curtis, that video is absolutely hillarious!
"With God, all things are possible"

Offline cjones

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #128 on: June 05, 2006, 11:35:00 PM »
Kevin, Glad to see you finaly made it on here. It was a pleasure to meet you in person. BTW, you weren't the runt of the litter cause you have me beat by 2 years!  :D
Chad Jones

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Offline Charlie Lamb

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #129 on: June 06, 2006, 08:07:00 AM »
With the morning heating up, Rob and I threw our gear in the truck and headed for a spot that I'd been wanting to check.

I'd done quite well on a small pond near the entrance to the ranch during the Texas Sweat. It had always showed me javelina's and I'd taken a pretty nice hog there as well.
When Andrew and Chris Kinslow hunted it, they too had had action with Javies and Chris arrowed a hog there as well. I had high hopes for it.

Considering the heavy rain the area had received a few weeks prior to this hunt, I shouldn't have been surprised by what I found when Rob and I walked in there.
Like all the rest of the ponds I'd seen, this one was brim full as well.

I had a good idea where I wanted to look for fresh sign, so we approached the water I split off to the right and Rob went left.
I slipped along the top of the pond bank, keeping an eye open for the javies I hoped were somewhere near... it was that time of day.
As I approached the end of dam a movement off in the brush below me brought me to a hault. A lone Javelina was walking through a clearing in the cactus some 25 yards below me.
I waited until he'd gone behind some shielding brush and moved quickly forward, thinking I'd catch him coming out the other side and with luck, up toward where I waited.

I guess he had other ideas, because that was the last I saw of him.

A quick inspection of the head of the pond where the water pinched down to a point showed lots of hog sign and some javie sign in the hard packed dirt. Fresh deer tracks in the mud at the waters edge showed that most of the animals in the area were using this point to access the water and would make it a near perfect ambush spot. I went to find Rob only to find him easing toward me along the dam.

We held a quick conference and Rob headed back toward the truck while I prepared a spot  to hide during the evenings hunt.
I found the perfect location under the spreading limbs of a large tree at the waters edge, not 15 yards from the point of most sign. A steady wind blew quartering toward the far end of the pond, so I was covered in that regard.

A little work with saw and rachet pruners and I had a perfect hide out.

Now all I had to do was wait for evening. Rob met me on the walk out and we returned to the truck... and then retraced our steps to recover the rabbit I'd shot and had stashed in a dead tree on the way in. Duh!!

Back at the camp house we shared the morning's adventures with the rest of the gang and filled empty bellies with more great chow.
I was planning another siesta for the mid day hours, but like the day before, a practice session broke out.

I'd suspected that my brace height was too low and had accounted for some erratic shooting the previous day, so I twisted the string up a few turns and joined Curt and JC to pound the block target  a little while.

Now I can tell ya, that when you're shooting with those guys, you'd better be on your toes. The boys can shoot! Throw Terry Green into the mix and you'd better be having a good day or they'll leave you crying in the dust.
The minor equiptment adjustment helped me in that department and I felt I was at least holding my own when the shooting started.

It turned out that JC was having a slight equiptment malfunction himself. His arrows were going pretty close to where he wanted them to, but the arrow flight was ratty to say the least. That wouldn't do for Joe and as Curt and I retired to the air conditioning, I noticed that Joe had come back out and was busilly pounding arrows into the target.

He would find the problem in his new shooting glove and fixed it when he returned to shooting his old retired glove. That simple switch cleaned up arrow flight to it's usual lazer like performance and Joe was once again laying them in there.
That's probably a good thing for me. Joe's a drop dead great shot!
***  
I was pretty anxious to get back out even though it was still pretty warm and Rob was champing at the bit as well, so we loaded up around 4 p.m. and headed for our respective spots.

I'd drop Rob off and head over to my little honey hole. It almost fealt like cheatin somehow.
Soon I was treading down the sendero to the pond that I'd come to like so much. Entry was silent and with a good wind I made it in with little commotion.

Nothing was around when I came up over the pond dam, so I eased on down to my new blind and settled in for the five hour vigil.

I'd anticipated mosquito problems since I'd be sitting virtually on the very edge of the pond, so I'd packed along my Thermacell. There was some doubt in my mind for a while whether the Thermacell would get cranked up first or the mosquitoes would drain me dry.
Fortunately the wind that we'd experienced since we got there held and helped keep them blown away until the Thermacell took over.

Those units don't work all that well in a strong breeze, but since I was sitting in the lee of the pond bank, I experienced periods of relative calm. That's when it really paid for itself. I owe Terry Green a big thanks for introducing me to them.

There's always activity around a Texas waterhole, so my time was well spent watching the bird life and just contemplating life in general... which may be the real benefit of sitting on stand anywhere afterall.

As the majic hour approached I noticed movement near the top of a rise I'd kept an eye on. I'm not sure why that particular place had held so much interest for me. Maybe some inner instinct kept me keyed to that spot or maybe it was just because it dominated my view.
There was a game trail there... I knew that much. But I was almost shocked when a deer stepped into veiw.
It looked so big standing there. In my eye's perspective that rise was much further than it turned out to be and the deer seemed to tower above my hiding spot. I expected him (it was a buck just starting to sprout this year's growth) to look right down into my blind, see me for what I was and leave, but it didn't happen.

Soon two more bucks joined the first. They stood immobile for long minutes seemingly seeing everything, but somehow missing the camo figure crouch low beneath them. After long minutes they approached the water and like many animals do once they've assured themselves that all is well, made haste to the water in front of me.

For a moment or two I thought it would be funny to suddenly stand up and scare them out of their wits. But somehow that seemed mean in this harsh country. I sat silently as they quenched there thirst, drinking long and deep of the cool water.

When all three had finished and stepped back from the waters edge, I raised my hand slowly to let them see me. The first one to spot the movement didn't flash away as I'd expected, but did that sideways head move that we've all seen. Finally, unsure of just what it was seeing it moved away from in front of my blind and melted off into the green Texas brush, it's two pals following nervously along behind.

That was all the action I had that night and before long darkness had fallen across the pond and I made my way back to the truck. Rob would be waiting and I was hungry. Camp seemed like a good place to be.
Hunt Sharp

Charlie

Offline JC

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #130 on: June 06, 2006, 08:25:00 AM »
Yep, my "equipment malfunction" was my first fluster in quite a while. And it only got worse as I tried to "fix" it. The frustration mounted as 1 out of 5 arrows would fly perfect then the other 4 would wobble and wave. It's even more frustrating when you are shooting with Curt and Charlie who were hitting at will, with arrows that flew seemingly without an arc their flight was so perfect. Soon came the short drawing, the too tight grip, the too loose grip, the wavering bow arm, string plucking....you name it I had it all happen right there as I got more and more frustrated. Charlie has me open my grip on the string really wide....arrow flew perfect. But I couldn't repeat the wide grip every time and it felt a little awkward. Eventually, I just stopped, and vowed I would shoot a bit later to figure out what was going on.

Later that evening I picked out a spot on a dozer pile near a road I was ambling down, drew back and released. Arrow flew like a dove on opening day....darting and cutting this way and that. But this time I noticed a "creeeeeaaaak" in my finger tips as I neared anchor. Second shot, same result. Dropped my pack, switched to my older glove whose strap needs replacement. Same two arrows, busted one nock this time. Four more shots and I got another clipped nock from the hex heads. Backed up, another arrow, just like it should fly.

Somehow, that new glove that worked perfectly at home was at least contributing to my arrow flight issues. Lack of humidity, sand and grit from crawling around, not polished smooth like the old one....I learned a VERY valuable lesson. One, if something goes completely out of whack with your normally acceptable shooting, it might be something really simple. And two, when something does get out of whack, don't let it get in your head or it becomes a snowball gaining size and momentum as it approaches destruction   :scared:
"Being there was good enough..." Charlie Lamb reflecting on a hunt
TGMM Brotherhood of the Bow

Offline Charlie Lamb

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #131 on: June 06, 2006, 08:33:00 AM »
"when something does get out of whack, don't let it get in your head or it becomes a snowball gaining size and momentum as it approaches destruction"

And that friends should be considered a word to the wise... from the wise.  :thumbsup:
Hunt Sharp

Charlie

Offline JC

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #132 on: June 06, 2006, 08:44:00 AM »
You know what "wisdom" really means don't ya Charlie?....."I screwed that up before"     :knothead:
"Being there was good enough..." Charlie Lamb reflecting on a hunt
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Offline Charlie Lamb

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #133 on: June 06, 2006, 10:22:00 AM »
With the last morning bearing down on the gang talk around the supper table was of how best to sneak in one last hunt. Everyone had early flights to make and most figured an hour or two in the morning would be fine.

Don't you just love it! The guys just couldn't give it up.

Morning came and attitudes remained the same, but reality had a much firmer hold than the night before. There were inspections at the airport to go through and the lines that go with that. There was the possibility of overly long tracking jobs to consider and vehicle malfunction had to be factored into the equation as well.

Since Curtis and I were the only ones with no time schedule to meet we bid farewell to our brothers in arms and headed for the brush. Leaving good friends is always a bitter pill to swallow, but we had soon washed it down with a cup of goin huntin and eased away from camp with high spirits and strung bows.

I'd grilled Bob Walker pretty thoroughly the night before about the spot he'd been hunting. Seems from talk around the table that he was one who'd experience the most sightings... not to mention shooting.
He gave me detailed directions to his "honey hole" and with my usual razor wit I promptly let them confuse me.

But Curtis knew exactly where Bob was talking about and since he and I had yet to hunt together we teamed up for this last morning.

While I worked one sendero, Curtis would work another close by. If he had any javie action at his location he would come and get me. Sounded like a plan to me.

I had action of my own almost immediately. I'd been looking for one last bunny to murder when I looked back down the sendero. I'd just come from that direction and didn't expect to see anything, but a shadow cast across the trail by a mesquite looked strange somehow.

Raising my binoculars to check it out, I could plainly see three javies feeding merrily in the trail road. The stalk was on.

Unfortunately, it took longer to close the distance than I'd figured and by the time I got close enough to sneak a look, the little musk hogs were gone. Poop! I was a little let down, figuring a guy would only get so many last minute chances and this was probably all I'd get.

Stepping out into the sendero I walked back toward the junction of another to see if maybe something was going on there.

It was about this time that I spotted Curtis truck. Figuring that he was coming to get me for the ride back to camp I trudged in his direction. Curtis is always considerate of my old knees and pulled down to shorten the distance of my walk.
As I slid my bow into the cab of the truck he told me he'd just left a group of javies on another sendero and we needed to go play.

My spirits immediately jumped and hunter mode replaced going home mode. Shortly we were back where he'd seem the javies and sure enough, there they were. Parking the truck out of sight, I grabbed my bow and Curtis grabbed his camera. He'd try and get a little of the action on video.

Our starting point gave us a favorable wind which was also strong enough to cover any tell tale noised we might make in the soft dust bordering the sendero. Soon we were within 50 yards of our quarry and all was going well.

The javies were now feeding away from us and it looked like we'd have to cross a long coverless stretch to close the gap. It would be a risk, but I could see no other alternative.

However! Curtis was intimately familiar with this stretch of trail and figured the javies would feed around a corner and out of sight. I figured that meant we'd close the distance as soon as they got behind the shielding cover.

In whispered tones, Curtis told me he thought the javies would round the corner and come right back out, since the little cove dead ended just a few yards into the cactus. A smart man knows not to "guide the guide" so we slid forward into what we thought would be a favorable ambush site.

We only waited a minute or two and I questioned whether the animals had really just eased on into the thicket. I guess it's doubt that adds to the excitement factor of any hunt and I was certainly excited.

Shortly I spotted the first javie as it fed back out of the little inlet in the sendero. It was a nice boar and he seemed to lead his buddies and they fed noisilly along.

I anticipated where the shot would come and positioned my body behind some cactus at an angle that would give me a favorable body angle. I waited on one knee as the javelina fed, while behind me CK worked his majic with the camera.

There was no doubt in my mind that Curtis would handle the situation without buggering it and also get the proper angle for the video action. I forgot about the camera and focused my full attention on the approaching game.

As the boar finally moved out from behind the shielding cover I positioned my bow and put slight pressure on the string. A razor sharp Magnus I w/bleeder sitting on the end of my Carbonwood shaft pointed at the spot I knew I'd take the shot.

When the javie cleared the cover I didn't like the angle and waited a little longer than I probably should have to take the shot. That meant I was fully exposed and apt to be spotted at any moment.

Finally, it was go time. The carbon shaft slid slowly across the rest in a movement designed to escape detection and as I touched anchor the arrow was away. It crossed the short space to my target in a blink and buried in the little pigs shoulder. Suddenly CK and I were alone and I stood to listen for the retreating javelina.

  Action Video  

Curtis was with me in an instant... excited as I was. He curse mildly (but frequently) as he checked the camera and thought for a second or two that he'd messed up and hadn't had the camera on video mode.

Disappointment set in on him, but I could have cared less. I was sure I had a solid hit and was more focused on recovery of the javie. I'd learned that until you have one of those tough little guys in hand, the game ain't over.

Soon we heard the unmistakable sound of javie jaws popping off in the brush about 50 yards away. It was a sign that the little tusker was dying and I breathed a sigh of relief.

We formed a recovery plan and Curtis walked to the truck to bring it closer and to retrieve "Sweet spot".... his tracking, brush busting, hog/javie whacking pick axe handle.

By now several minutes had passed so we took the trail. Curtis immediately found blood sign and eased a little deeper into the brush.
I was several feet to his side when he started yelling, "get outta here!!! GET!!!". Puzzled, I asked what was going on.

"There's a damn javie right here", he said pointing right in front of him, "and he's mad as hell".

Taking a step back he half raised "Sweet Spot" in case the javie rushed him. Javelina can be very protective of there herd mates and for a moment that's what we thought was going on.

Once more Curtis took a step forward and once again stopped, saying the javie was right there in front of him. "Wait! It's got a wound in it's side. Get over here!!"

I slid a big two blade on the string and eased into the cover from where Curtis had taken a couple of steps back. I could just make out grizzled gray hair through the tangle. Looking for any kind of opening I could find I finally was able to make out a four inch hole that would let my arrow pass directly to the wounded javies shoulder.

The arrow was gone in a flash, burying deep in the javie and stopped only by the dirt behind him. That settled it.

Soon CK and I were shaking hands over my second javelina of the season and a last minute success.
Hunt Sharp

Charlie

Offline Charlie Lamb

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #134 on: June 06, 2006, 10:26:00 AM »


 
Hunt Sharp

Charlie

Offline Littlefeather

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #135 on: June 06, 2006, 11:42:00 AM »
Well told Charlie! Somehow even an outing as fine as this one was somewhat eclipsed by the few final minutes of the hunt. The experience to have created the moment by laying a game plan, having a bright light shine, and stalking it to the perfect ending was truly a highlight of my hunting career. I never for a single moment wished to be behind the bow on that final morning. For me, the spectating was all the adrenaline my body could handle and having been there to share with a great friend was all I could even dream of. Somehow everything that could have gone wrong never did. The few things that could have happened correctly took hold and against the odds that ride with every Bowhunter as he closes the final few yards, the door slammed shut. The javi had taken an arrow on flat ground, inside of ten yards, in his own living room. Sometime a guy just has to wonder how it all comes to pass without "Murphy" vetoing the moment with his insertion of CK's-Murphy's Law....... Wouldn't have missed it for the World!!!!! Congrats once again Charlie. I'll cherish that clip forever. CK

Offline Littlefeather

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #136 on: June 06, 2006, 12:06:00 PM »
I thought I may add a few things to this finale.
There had been ample time from the shot till the time we started to track this arrowed creature of armor. Any animal I've ever encountered would have gone down in an instant from a shot like this but somehow, some way, this little javelina was still on his feet and ready to eat my face each time I bent down to start tracking again. Little did I know it was the same javi that Charlie had shot and really believed it was another of the protective tribesman of that javi's clan. I've often seen them stand guard over their fallen commrads.
 After we came to realize that the javi showing me little room was actually Charlies javi, he was planted for good. Back at camp, Charlie autopsied the javi to see why he had failed to go down. The findings left Charlie and I both staring at each other in disbelief. There was a perfect 4-blade hole through one lung, diaphram, liver, pancreas, stomach and ended at what appeared to be the severed femoral artery. I have never in my life seen such destruction not dispatch "any" animal. I think Grenade tipped arrows are in order for the next trip south. CK

Offline rabbitman

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #137 on: June 06, 2006, 12:07:00 PM »
Congrats Charlie.  Wish the rest of us could have still been there to slap you on the back in person.  Looking forward to hunting with you again in the future.  And Curtis....see you next week and good job getting the big guy on film.   :thumbsup:

Offline Kevin Smith

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #138 on: June 06, 2006, 12:10:00 PM »
Charlie, great adventure and story to end that weekend with, couldn't ask for anything better. Curtis, Great Bleepin' video!
Chad, it was a pleasure meeting you as well, sorry again that you had to go, but glad things are ok.
"Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence"

Offline Littlefeather

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Re: The road goes on-Moderator Meltdown
« Reply #139 on: June 06, 2006, 12:13:00 PM »
Thanks Kev! Did you talk to Lucky for me? Call me. CK

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