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Author Topic: Stacking messing with form  (Read 786 times)

Offline FrankM

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Stacking messing with form
« on: April 22, 2016, 01:52:00 PM »
My form is almost there, but my #40 Sage has stacking after 28" with my #40 Sage. I draw 28 1/2". I think sometimes I pull to 29". This causes the stacking to feel a bit "variable" and causes me to lose concentration and interferes with the development of my form.

I've considered switching out to a Samick Journey which is longer. But the real cause might just be me. Any suggestions?

Online McDave

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Re: Stacking messing with form
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2016, 02:45:00 PM »
The Sage is a 62" bow, and should not stack at a 29" draw, so something else might be going on.  It does, of course, continue to increase in draw weight the more you draw it, 2-3# per inch of draw, as all bows do.  So if you draw it 28 1/2 one time and 29 the next, you will feel a difference in draw weight.

Of course, it is possible that something could be wrong with that particular bow, but stacking at 29" should not be a problem with the Sage in general.
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Offline FrankM

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Re: Stacking messing with form
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2016, 04:17:00 PM »
Well, maybe stacking is too harsh of a word. Kinda throws me off though when I'm trying to concentrate about not making any mistakes. I kn ow what my form is supposed to be, trying to build the habit.

Online McDave

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Re: Stacking messing with form
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2016, 05:25:00 PM »
Stacking means that the pulled weight increases disproportionately with each inch of draw.  For example, a bow may be designed to increase 2# for every inch pulled up to 29".  Maybe it increases 3# from 29-30", and 4# from 30-31".  The higher than normal increase in weight/inch after 29" is called stacking.

I would guess that what you're experiencing is just the normal force of the bow.  It is a struggle for all of us to maintain constant back tension against the force of the bow while we do everything else that's required to get off an accurate shot.  That's the main challenge of traditional archery compared with compound archery.

It might reassure you if an experienced archer or an archery shop experienced in trad bows could take a look at your bow to make sure everything is okay with it.
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Offline FrankM

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Re: Stacking messing with form
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2016, 05:38:00 PM »
I get your point. My neighbor's #50 Grizzly doesn't do it and I can pull to full draw. His bow gets harder to pull, yes, but it's a smooth transition. Mine begins to get harder quicker after 28". I guess it's probably at the point where it "begins" to stack.

I guess my question is, as someone who is now starting to figure out form, is this detrimental? Or just something to work through?

I could easily pick up a 64" Journey if needed.

Online McDave

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Re: Stacking messing with form
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2016, 06:17:00 PM »
For me to recommend that you buy a 64" Journey would be like giving heroin to a kid.  It would be the start of a long, destructive spiral ending up with you drooling at the mouth while you sit in a room full of bows like I do.
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Online McDave

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Re: Stacking messing with form
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2016, 07:17:00 PM »
Seriously, a 62" bow should be able to handle draw lengths up to 30" easily.  It could be that what you're experiencing is the difference between an entry level bow and a higher quality bow.  If that is the case, you're unlikely to be satisfied with a 64" Journey, which is evidently the same as a Sage except for limb length.  At the risk of getting you "hooked," you may want to move up to a higher quality bow instead.  There are plenty of 60" bows that draw to 29" and more without stacking.  I know what you mean, though.  I prefer a 64" bow myself at my 28" draw length, because it feels smoother to me.  The trade off is that a 64" bow will not shoot as fast as a comparable 60" bow at the same draw length.
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Offline FrankM

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Re: Stacking messing with form
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2016, 09:37:00 PM »
I think I got it. Went into the garage and pulled to proper form without shooting. It only seemed to tighten more when I was locking my bow arm elbow. Didn't realize I did that sometimes. Phew, closer. Thanks for jogging my brain!

Offline Caughtandhobble

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Re: Stacking messing with form
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2016, 09:49:00 PM »
In my limited experience with Sages you may want to check the actual draw weight. I know of two Sages that were around 5 lbs heavier than written on bow. Like you, they seem to stack very, very early on in the draw to me as well.

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