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Author Topic: Newbie Question. Sorry....  (Read 306 times)

Offline Tradbowjim

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Newbie Question. Sorry....
« on: June 10, 2020, 08:25:41 AM »
This is my first post and it is a long one, sorry.
I just purchased a Galaxy Sage 30# shooting Gold Tip Warrior 700 arrows with 125 gr field tips.  Arrow length is 30 inches. My draw length is 28.5 inches.  Shooting fingers. I have my nock set at 3/8 inch and brace height just a tad under 8 inches.   
I have been reading a lot, stalking tradgang.com and watching a lot of youtube videos.  There are a couple of things I did learn. Number one it’s all about form and consistency.  Number two it seems difficult to build form and consistency if the equipment is not tuned.  Which brings me to the first question.  How do I tune equipment and determine if its me or the equipment?   
I watched the video “The Push” and to reduce the mental stress a bit, I have decided I like the three under with the fixed crawl. I think that by picking one method and staying with that method will help me to build and improve a form.  But in the video, Matt discusses how his bow hits something like 20 inches high at 20 yards and is point on at 40 yds.  Which brings me to the second question. How do I determine what my point of impact is at 40 yds when I cannot consistently hit the same spot at 20 yds?
And that leads me to my last question.  At what distance should I start and practice at?  I feel if I start at 10 yds. it builds false confidence as I do tend to group okay, but isn’t 10 yards too short for the arrow to react to form issues?   I moved back to 20 yds and I do okay, but am I doing myself a disservice by being that distance?  While it gives the arrow time to work out its issues, how can I tell the difference between form and just not hitting where I am aiming?
Any advice on where to start distances etc. would be greatly appreciated.  In addition, feel free to comment on bow set up etc.  Any suggestions as to what accessories I should have?  i.e type of quiver, silencers
Thank you for your input.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2020, 03:30:17 PM by Tradbowjim »

Offline Sam McMichael

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Re: Newbie Question. Sorry....
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2020, 09:02:28 AM »
I would start at 15 yards, because it is close enough that you don't miss the target often, while being able to see poor arrow flight. However, if you are doing okay at 20 yards, that may be a good location. It will give form flaws ample room to display themselves. Also, when you are grouping well at 20, you are well on the way to hunting proficiency. Remember that there are always setbacks. Some days it seems you are Robin Hood and other days just the court jester. Don't let that get you down, just use it as an indicator of form issues that need further attention. Just keep practicing, and the work will pay off. Good luck.
Sam

Online McDave

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Re: Newbie Question. Sorry....
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2020, 09:52:45 AM »
Hi Jim, welcome to TradGang! 

What is your drawlength?  To find out, ask someone to mark the arrow where it crosses the back of the bow while you are at full draw.  The back of the bow is the side facing the target.  Why don't we call it the front of the bow?  Good question.  If you don't have someone to mark the arrow for you, then cut out a square of cardboard and cut a slot in it or something so it slides against the back of the bow as you draw the arrow.  Measure the distance from the bottom of the slot of the arrow nock to the point where the arrow crosses the back of the bow.

Best would be to take an archery class or seminar, because an instructor can spot things that you wouldn't notice that will help you to get off to a good start.  The Push podcasts are great.  Look up Arne Moe's videos on YouTube.  Buy the whole series of Masters of the Bare Bow from Three Rivers or some other place that might carry it.

Depending on your draw length, I suggest you change to 100 grain points, and change your nock point from 3/8” to 5/8” if you plan to shoot 3 under.  Put the fixed crawl on hold for a while under you figure things out on a more basic level.  Then just shoot at whatever distance you want and have fun!  In a class, they will want you to shoot at a closer distance until you develop good form, but since you don't know what good form is yet anyway, just shoot and have fun and pick up whatever you can from the videos.  That's the way most of us learned.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2020, 09:58:58 AM by McDave »
TGMM Family of the Bow

Would someone please make up my mind for me?

Offline Tradbowjim

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Re: Newbie Question. Sorry....
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2020, 03:29:42 PM »
Thanks for the responses.  McDave, my draw length is 28.5.  I will find some 100 grain points and see how they work.  Thanks for the advice.

Online McDave

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Re: Newbie Question. Sorry....
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2020, 06:44:18 PM »
I believe with a draw length of 28.5”, your setup should work fine with the changes I mentioned without worrying about tuning issues.  It is a mistake to worry about tuning before you have developed basic form, because changes in your form will change your tune.

Equipment is all a matter of personal preference.  Most people who shoot 3 under use a tab, although some use a glove.  Make sure the tab is not too big, or if you use a glove, that it fits snugly.  3 under shooters should put a nock under the arrow as well as over it.  Most trad shooters prefer to tie on their own string nocks rather than using crimped on brass nocks. 

Their are 4 types of quivers in common use: bow quiver, hip quiver, back quiver, and side quiver.  Most serious hunters use bow quivers.  The problem with bow quivers is that they are awkward to use when practicing or in a tournament.  Serious bow hunters don't care, as all their practice and tournaments are primarily to prepare for hunting, so they want to use all the same gear they will use to hunt.  I hunt, but I am more serious about 3D tournaments, so I use a hip quiver that attaches to my belt, as it is the most convenient way to carry arrows in a tournament. When I hunt I use a Safari Tuff side quiver, as it keeps my arrows quiet and dry and hides them from view.  I don't use a bow quiver for the same reason serious hunters never shoot without one on the bow: having one on the bow affects the way a bow balances and feels, so it should either be always on or always off.  I've tried to love a back quiver, because it is so traditional, but I just don't.  All the back quivers I’ve tried to love do work well to hold my extra arrows at home, however.

Another thing I should have mentioned before is that if personal instruction is not an option, you should consider sending in a video for Arne Moe to evaluate.  He is an excellent, level 4 instructor, and has helped countless people here in the past.

Your post was a mixture of form and equipment related questions, so I chose to deal with both here in the shooting form forum. However, in the future you will get better responses to equipment related questions in PowWow.
TGMM Family of the Bow

Would someone please make up my mind for me?

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