Author Topic: Quick question  (Read 168 times)

Offline Afgos

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Quick question
« on: October 20, 2020, 01:43:40 AM »
Good day gentlemen has anyone used tibouchina urvilleana or species from the same family or Melaleuca bracteata  as a bow wood? Just curious as they both grow down here. Thanks in advance.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2020, 04:21:12 AM by Afgos »

Offline Flem

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Re: Quick question
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2020, 09:40:22 AM »
I think we are going to need the street names for those trees and maybe some pics of the wood.

Online Mad Max

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Re: Quick question
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2020, 09:49:54 AM »
Pruning requirement: needed for strong structure

Breakage: susceptible to breakage

Wood specific gravity: unknow
"nothing ventured ,nothing gained"

Online Roy from Pa

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Re: Quick question
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2020, 09:58:04 AM »
Tibouchina urvilleana is a species of flowering plant in the family Melastomataceae, native to Brazil. Growing to 3–6 m (10–20 ft) tall by 2–3 m (7–10 ft) wide, it is a sprawling evergreen shrub with longitudinally veined, dark green hairy leaves.

Evergreen shrub, " pine ".

No good for bows.

Offline Flem

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Re: Quick question
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2020, 10:38:23 AM »
Yeah that first one you listed, does not sound like a good prospect, but it looks like a pretty shrub. The second one is in the Myrtle family, which is used often in the states for risers. Don't know if anyone has made a bow or milled lams from Myrtle?

Offline Afgos

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Re: Quick question
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2020, 11:26:01 AM »
Thanks. The first one I didn't think it would work. The second one is also known a Black Tea Tree. Thanks again.

Online KenH

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Re: Quick question
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2020, 11:03:01 AM »
Roy -- remember that "evergreen" does not necessarily mean "needle trees" like North American pine or juniper or spruce or fir.  In the subtropics and tropics, broadleaved evergreens are VERY common -- rosewood, ipe, and bubinga are just a couple of examples.   
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Online Roy from Pa

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Re: Quick question
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2020, 06:50:40 PM »
 :thumbsup:

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