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Author Topic: STRING SLAP  (Read 435 times)

Offline TomMcDonald

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STRING SLAP
« on: July 09, 2019, 01:46:49 AM »
Hello all,
So I've been shooting longbows for almost 12 years and never had this issue --- until now!
I recently got a 23" Hoyt Excel riser with long recurve limbs and I just can't shake the string slap.
No matter what I do, it's there!
Changing grip, rotating the elbow, opening my stance right up, brace height up to 9 and 1/4", loose nock fit.... This crap hurts and I'm really not enjoying shooting this beast.
Any suggestions would be incredibly helpful.
Thanks,
Tom.

Online moebow

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2019, 07:30:37 AM »
You've addressed the most common errors Tom.  Exactly where is the hit on your arm? Do you have a video?

Armguard??

Arne
11 H Hill bows
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4 James Berry bows
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Offline TomMcDonald

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2019, 08:51:16 PM »
Hi Arne,
Thanks for the reply. I'm trying to put together a video which might take a few days - it's winter here and I don't get any daylight leisure time at the moment!
The impact point is dead middle of the inner forearm. Every time.
I'll be back with a video in a couple of days.
And yes I've been using an arm guard.

Online McDave

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2019, 08:57:51 PM »
Were the longbows not cut to center and the recurve cut past center?  If so, what did you do to adjust to the different POI when you switched to the recurve cut past center?
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Offline TomMcDonald

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2019, 09:40:35 PM »
Were the longbows not cut to center and the recurve cut past center?  If so, what did you do to adjust to the different POI when you switched to the recurve cut past center?

Hello McDave,
Yes that's correct.
Since making this post I've adjusted centreshot on the recurve using a plunger -  I was putting off tuning till I got this slap sorted but at the suggestion of someone else I did a bit of tuning.
There still seems to be a bit of slap, although it seems to have reduced in severity somewhat. I haven't been game to shoot without the arm guard though  :smileystooges: Once my bruise heals a bit I'll do some more testing.
Thanks for the response, it's definitely something to consider.
Tom.

Online McDave

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2019, 11:07:38 PM »
One thing to consider is that increased tension can cause string slap.  Increased tension can result from a changed sight picture which is the necessary result of changing from a shelf cut short of center to a shelf cut past center.  Somehow it just doesn't look right to your brain, and your brain compensates with increased tension.  Particularly with a recurve, your bow hand should not have a tight grip on the bow: the thumb and forefinger should be gripping the bow just enough to keep it from falling on the ground when you shoot it, with the other fingers trailing off to the side.  The same is true of the string fingers: any tendency to torque the string should be evident by a movement of the bow limbs, generally counterclockwise, which should be apparent if there is a very loose grip by the bow hand that allows the movement to happen.  Remember, with a shelf cut past center, your arrow shaft is going to be pointed to the right of your old sight picture, and you're going to have to move your bow hand to the left to bring it on target.  The bow hand and string hand are not the only places tension could occur, but they are a good place to start looking.
TGMM Family of the Bow

Would someone please make up my mind for me?

Offline TomMcDonald

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2019, 11:36:59 PM »
One thing to consider is that increased tension can cause string slap.  Increased tension can result from a changed sight picture which is the necessary result of changing from a shelf cut short of center to a shelf cut past center.  Somehow it just doesn't look right to your brain, and your brain compensates with increased tension.  Particularly with a recurve, your bow hand should not have a tight grip on the bow: the thumb and forefinger should be gripping the bow just enough to keep it from falling on the ground when you shoot it, with the other fingers trailing off to the side.  The same is true of the string fingers: any tendency to torque the string should be evident by a movement of the bow limbs, generally counterclockwise, which should be apparent if there is a very loose grip by the bow hand that allows the movement to happen.  Remember, with a shelf cut past center, your arrow shaft is going to be pointed to the right of your old sight picture, and you're going to have to move your bow hand to the left to bring it on target.  The bow hand and string hand are not the only places tension could occur, but they are a good place to start looking.

Thanks Dave. I'll be keeping tabs on things as I go. This response makes sense.
I do have a quick video that looks at grip but the angle is not great. What's not evident is that the ring to pinky fingers are essentially resting on the grip and the thumb and pointer are doing the work.
Let me know what you see if you don't mind.
Tom.
P.S I'll have better videos very soon.
Tom.


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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2019, 12:12:59 AM »
I see good bow hand position as you are holding the bow waiting for release.  I see some kind of clinching going on when you release the shot, that moves your forearm into the path of the string.  I would guess that if you could maintain your good bow hand position through completion, you wouldn’t have string slap.
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Online McDave

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2019, 12:17:49 AM »
One of the archery greats said, “on release, do nothing.”  When you release, you’re doing something.
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Offline TomMcDonald

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2019, 12:52:53 AM »
I see good bow hand position as you are holding the bow waiting for release.  I see some kind of clinching going on when you release the shot, that moves your forearm into the path of the string.  I would guess that if you could maintain your good bow hand position through completion, you wouldn’t have string slap.

Thanks McDave, you're right. Maybe I'm trying to catch the riser before it falls at the shot. If I use my thumb and index finger to capture the riser maybe I won't be worried about it dropping (I've had that happen before and broke the lower limb tip).
Something for me to work on.
Appreciate it.

Offline TomMcDonald

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2019, 05:00:36 AM »
I managed to get some filming before dark.
One thing I can see is a significant collapse on most of the shots. I'll work on that ASAP! Could that lead to wrist slap issues?
Thanks all, appreciate all the help.

Online moebow

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Re: STRING SLAP
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2019, 07:48:59 AM »
Tom,  I see 2 things that in combination, I believe, are contributing to your string slap.

First, your bow hand wrist is straight (high wrist) which is a pretty weak position.  Think about doing pushups.  You take the wrist out of the exercise by placing your hands flat on the floor -- taking the wrist out of the pushup.  Yes, you can do pushups on your knuckles with wrists straight but it is a much less stable position.

Second, your large pluck with your string hand at release.  Remember that the bow (and a weak wrist in the bow hand) will follow the string.  So if you pull that string to the left at release, that will turn the bow and bow hand wrist to the right so the plane of force aims at your bow arm. Hence string slap.

I'd suggest that you readdress your bow hand position, especially wrist position AND work on getting your release hand to move straight back rather than popping out like it does in these videos.

If you don't have a coach, this will take some careful and deliberate practice to fix.  But I believe these corrections will fix your problem.  Good luck!!

Arne
11 H Hill bows
3 David Miller bows
4 James Berry bows
USA Archery, Level 4 NTS Coach

Are you willing to give up what you are; to become what you could be?

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