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Author Topic: split vision training methods  (Read 3410 times)

Offline arachnid

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split vision training methods
« on: March 24, 2019, 09:26:45 AM »
Hi Guys.
I`ve been sooting instinctive for several years, and recently I`m trying to improve my accuracy by starting to apply split vision to my sight picture. I understand that`s similar to what Howard Hill used (he called it indirect aiming).
I don`t want to transition to gap and then use split vision, just apply split vision elements to my shooting.

Is that possible?
If so, I`d like to know some training methods I can use to improve.
Thanks

Online McDave

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2019, 10:57:57 AM »
From everything I’ve read, Howard transitioned directly from instinctive to split vision.  I’ve haven’t read anything to indicate that he ever used gap.  My own opinion is that Howard would have been unlikely to want to use gap other than maybe to try it out because the methodical requirements of gap would interfere with his fluid shooting style.

The biggest problem that people seem to have in learning to shoot either gap or split vision is to maintain the focus on the target at all times, and keep the arrow point in the out of focus peripheral vision.  If you find yourself switching your focus back and forth between the target and the arrow point, or worse, focusing on the arrow point instead of the target, you should let the shot down and start over again.

The biggest advantage of split vision over gap is that you can keep your mind in the non-cognitive mode of thinking (thinking without using words) when shooting split vision, the same as you would when shooting instinctive.  So try not to overthink it.  There are advantages to gap over split vision also, but we are not interested in those right now.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 11:15:43 AM by McDave »
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Offline arachnid

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2019, 11:34:01 AM »
The main problem I seem to have is that I'm focusing on the target without paying enough attention to the position of the arrow. I'm trying to get a "mental imprint" so I can shoot the same shot again but I find it very difficult.

Online McDave

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2019, 12:09:23 PM »
Yes, that seems normal to me when transitioning from instinctive to split vision.  One of the main things we’re told to do when learning to shoot instinctive is to ignore the arrow point, and now you want to completely reverse that!

Give yourself at least 60 days of shooting while trying to be aware of the arrow point in your out of focus peripheral vision (60 actual shooting days, not total days) to change a firmly established habit.  Make sure you’re not focusing on the arrow point.  You’ll get there.  It’s a great way to shoot, as Howard Hill discovered.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 12:16:03 PM by McDave »
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Offline arachnid

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2019, 12:28:55 PM »
Thanks Dave.
Do you know any actual techniques  for training other then just shoot?

Online McDave

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2019, 12:47:16 PM »
To put it into perspective, 99% of learning to shoot the bow is learning good form, and 1% is learning to aim.  However, if you think you have a good handle on the 99%, here is a good article on the other 1%:  http://www.tradgang.com/pdf-files/aiming_the_arrow.pdf
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Offline arachnid

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2019, 12:49:55 PM »
Thanks Dave.  I'm going to print it right away.

Online Sam McMichael

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2019, 02:07:24 PM »
I don't know if my aiming method falls under split vision or not. Maybe kinda sorta, but at least it works for me. I maintain focus on the intended point of impact like instictive, yet in my peripheral vision, I am aware of the arrow shaft, but closer to my eye, not at the point. I do not see the point itself at all. My natural tendency when not being aware of the general direction my arrow is pointing is to shoot considerably to the right (no, I'm not left eye dominant, just not well coordinated). This allows me to know the arrow is at least generally pointed straight down range. Initially, it took real effort not to use the point in a gapping sequence. I do not use an especially fast release but rather a deliberate, albeit sometimes sloppy, one.
Sam

Jim Casto Jr

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2019, 11:16:52 AM »
Bob Wesley, a protégé of Howard Hill wrote a book several years ago called, “Indirect Aiming."  It was a comprehensive guide to teaching the method.  I’ve got a copy of it somewhere; it’s really simple.

You simply go to your target and lay a paper plate on the ground or just below the mark. At 10 yards you focus on the tip of the arrow in the center of the plate. Move the plate, up or down, until you’re hitting the mark. Then, you transfer your focus to the mark, noticing the tip of the arrow in the center of the plate in your periphery. Stay there until you burn that sight picture into your mind.

Move to 15 yards and repeat; 20, 30 etc. etc.

In short order you’ll have your sight picture at different distances burnt in your mind and can quit using the plate.  Indirect aiming is sort of like a hybrid between instinctive and gap.  You’ll get to the place where you get a “feel” for the gap. 

Online moebow

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2019, 04:50:17 PM »
Yes, I agree with Jim C.  Bob Wesley will teach you to gap, write down the gaps at different distances then "evolve" you into learning the gap distances (memorize) and then moving the gaps into your secondary vision.  It works WELL!!  I believe that learning a split vision technique from "purely" instinctive technique would be difficult since you nave no "starting" reference.

Arne
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Offline arachnid

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2019, 05:01:33 PM »
I've read an article by Bob Wesley that explains his method in short. The thing is I don't want to start memorizing gaps and distances. I guess it'll be challenging to move from instinctive to split vision without gap but I'm willing to take it.
What I'm trying to do is located the arrow in my peripheral vision in the pre-draw step and take a mental note of its location. Then I draw, anchor and make sure my sight picture looks right. Then I release. I think i can use the pre-draw step as a reference.
I'm also trying to apply a somewhat rotational draw so I'm changing a few things in my technique.

Online moebow

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2019, 05:18:18 PM »
Sorry arachnid, that makes NO sense to me.  Howard's "split vision" technique is a refinement of gap aiming.  IF you don't have an idea of the hold under (or over) for a target then what you see in your peripheral vision has no relevance.  In that case "instinctive aiming" (whatever that is) is a better approach.

Arne

PS. "pre-aiming" ??   As in before you start the draw?  Do you aim a gun precisely, then get a cartridge out of your pocket, place it in the chamber, etc. all the while holding a careful aim????  I submit that the bow isn't aimed until at full draw. No sense in aiming until you are loaded and ready to shoot.

PPS. Good luck!!

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Jim Casto Jr

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2019, 05:58:53 PM »
Pre-aiming, to my notion, is one of the absolute best ways for many to aquire target panic.  Please don't ask how I know that.

I think aiming is best left until after you've come to full draw and engaged your back.  When you're loaded, you can then aim.

Good luck to you.


Online McDave

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2019, 11:54:29 PM »
I don't believe that Howard Hill ever memorized gaps and distances. I believe he started down the path toward split vision by wanting a method for improving on his first shot.  He no doubt had almost perfect form, so he could be confident that wherever his first arrow went, his second arrow would also go if he held the same for his second shot.  The problem was, what if his first shot went low or high?  He found that if he noticed where the arrow point was when he fired his first shot, then if his first shot went low or high, he had a point of reference to adjust for his second shot.  This is a short hop away from always noticing where the arrow point is for any shot, and placing the arrow point in the same relative position for any shot where the distance seems to be the same. 

What is really the difference between “seems to be the same” and “seems to be 30 yards?”  The difference is that “seems to be 30 yards” requires cognitive thinking, which takes your mind away from awareness of the bow, which is only possible when thinking non-cognitively.  This is fine if you want to hunt with a range finder or shoot at marked distances.  But if you want to hunt without a rangefinder or shoot at unknown distances, I believe split vision works better than gap.  I think this is really what Howard Hill meant when he said, “You have to decide what you want to do, boys, hunt or shoot targets.”  (Probably not the exact quote).  If you want to aim using split vision, I see no benefit in taking a detour through gap.
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Offline arachnid

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2019, 01:13:42 AM »
Dave you nailed it.
That's exactly what I'm looking for. I'm not looking for a new aiming method, I enjoy shooting instinctively and most of my shooting is 3D, without knowing the distance.  All I'm looking for is a way to improve accuracy and some kind of reference system I can use to current the next arrow should I miss the first one.

Arnie, I get the point about pre-aiming. I don't think that's what I'm doing.  I'm not aiming . I'm focusing on the target.  My pre-draw step is just some kind of "check point " for me to make sure I'm still focused AND locate the arrow in my peripheral vision.  I hope that makes more sense now. Kind hard to explain 🤷‍♂️

Offline Wolftrail

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2019, 10:37:27 PM »
Great topic but could someone explain split vision in a few sentences and/or simpler terms.  I understand the concept of gap.  My way of shooting is hold my eyes on the target as I draw then momentarily view the arrow tip then hold eyes on target at my anchor and let loose.  I have heard of so many methods it makes my head spin.  Also heard of a Modified Gap.. :dunno:

"He found that if he noticed where the arrow point was when he fired his first shot, then if his first shot went low or high, he had a point of reference to adjust for his second shot."   I used that method in 3-D and it worked great for me.   Problem is the first shot is a dud no matter how you look at it.

Jim Casto Jr

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2019, 10:41:22 PM »
Focusing on the mark but being aware of where the tip of the arrow is in your periphery.




Online McDave

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2019, 11:19:52 PM »
“My way of shooting is hold my eyes on the target as I draw then momentarily view the arrow tip then hold eyes on target at my anchor and let loose.”

That could be your problem.  As Jim said, focus on the mark.  Do not momentarily view the arrow tip.  Instead, keep focusing on the mark all the time.  Keep the arrow tip in your peripheral vision all the time.  This can seem a little weird at first, looking at two things at the same time, one of them clear, one of them fuzzy.  It's something you may be a little reluctant to let yourself do.  But keep at it and after a while you'll feel pretty normal about it. If you momentarily view the arrow tip, let the bow down and start all over again.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2019, 11:26:29 PM by McDave »
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Offline Wolftrail

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2019, 11:30:17 PM »
 "Keep the arrow tip in your peripheral vision all the time."     thx guys in a nutshell that pretty well wraps it up.   Hopefully it wont take me long to re-adjust.  At times I may vary or stray from my norm which some us do occasionally and  Subconsciously fluke out so to speak.   I like fluking when another archer is standing beside me.    :bigsmyl:

pavan

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Re: split vision training methods
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2019, 07:16:54 PM »
When I shift my focus from target to arrow tip, the eye NOT over the arrow sees the arrow better because it has a better side perspective.  When shooting left handed, if i stop and look at my draw length I will tend to shoot high and right.  If i pull that stunt right handed, i tend to shoot high and left.  The tighter the focus on the the center of a center, the better the secondary vision can give a clear signal to the brain.  When the eyes are jumping around, so does the visual information.

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