Author Topic: Survival Gear  (Read 929 times)

Offline NY Yankee

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Survival Gear
« on: September 21, 2018, 07:14:31 PM »
Every outdoors man, hunter, angler, hiker, should carry some basic survival gear to get you through a dark and lonely night should you find yourself unable to return to the truck or camp. Many of these items may be mentioned in other lists but I would like to do a list of specific things you may want to make a bit of room for. They are not heavy and you will be happy you have them if you need them.

There are 6 priorities to consider and you should have at least something to cover them all;

1. Signal for help. If you can get out of trouble before it becomes a survival situation, you are ahead. Cell phones are great if you have service or can text, A good signal mirror can be seen for miles and can signal ground service as well as aircraft. A small emergency road flare is good for after dark and lighting a signal fire too. Dont forget a good flashlight and some extra batteries too. A Storm or Jet Scream emergency whistle - they can get someone's attention (rescue dog?) for a long, long way away. Many hundreds of yards. Your voice will be shot after a couple of minutes. You can blow the whistle all day long.

2. Build a fire. This provides you warmth, signalling, a way to boil and disinfect water, and makes you feel better as you sit near it to keep warm. I always have 3 ways to start a fire and some extra tinder to get it started if nothing is available around me. Storm proof matches in a watertight container, two Bic lighters in a ziploc bag, and a ferrocerium rod if the others fail. Strike sparks into some Vaseline-soaked cotton balls and you will get it started.

3. Gather water. Either carry a full canteen or a large stainless steel bottle so you can boil water once you have collected it from a stream or pond. I keep a SS drinking cup nested over my bottle too. A small bottle of 2% Iodine will also help disinfect the water, 5 drops per quart or liter. I also have a 3 foot length of fish tank hose to use as a drinking tube if needs be. Water is an absolute necessity.

4.Make shelter. Carry a lightweight plastic sheet or tarp to make a roof, wind break, or at least, wrap around you. Two plastic 55 gal drum liners can do the same and can be used for other things too. Don't forget a roll of cordage to use to tie it down or up or whatever. Even simple sisal cord will work, it just needs to be strong cordage. I do not like nylon because it comes unwound if you cannot melt the ends and can be tough to keep knots tight. Same goes with Paracord.

5.First aid. A good first aid kit should have at least one trauma bandage to deal with blood loss as well as bandages
 for the other boo-boo's. Everybody needs at least a basic FAK. Look into building one of your own.

6. Food is a controversial topic because all the experts say you don't need food for several days but I wonder if they have ever tried it?  When you haven't had anything to eat in many hours, it's not a very nice feeling. I get an upset stomach and worse, low blood sugar too. A few meal replacement bars do not weigh that much and go a long way in making you feel better as you wait to hike out or for help to come. This will be all up to you though.

This all may seem like a lot of extra stuff but it really isn't. A couple of extra pounds in your pack may make life a little easier once bad things happen when you least expect it.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2018, 12:52:51 PM by NY Yankee »
Elk don't know how many feet a horse has!

Online SAM E. STEPHENS

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Re: Survival Gear
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2018, 12:47:30 PM »
I always get made fun of because my pack always has stuff like you talked about but everyone sure don’t hesitate to use my stuff when they need it...

,,Sam,,
HUNT OLD SCHOOL

Offline NY Yankee

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Re: Survival Gear
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2018, 01:52:51 PM »
 :biglaugh: Sam, I know, me too. I strongly believe the Boy Scouts got it right!
Elk don't know how many feet a horse has!

Offline Wudstix

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Re: Survival Gear
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2019, 11:37:57 AM »
On track.
"If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much space!!!" - Me
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Online BAK

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Re: Survival Gear
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2019, 04:08:03 PM »
Agreed   :help:
"May your blood trails be short and your drags all down hill."

Offline Angus

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Re: Survival Gear
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2019, 09:14:55 AM »
Carrying the necessities is always a priority!  Knowing how to take care of yourself in the forest is becoming a lost art, as we depend on technology to keep us safe more and more these days.  If you have an increased knowledge of woodcraft, you can lighten your load by ditching the technological "wonders".  that said, I do carry a Garmin satphone linked with my phone, but that's only because my wife insists.  Otherwise, I have no use for the things.  My loadout is as follows: ferro rod, full tang knife, small folding saw, paracord, a small pot that stores the emergency bivy bag, some cliff bars and instant coffee, an MSR Trailshot water filter, a small cup, and some first aid stuff, along with a whistle.  Depending on what season I'm out in the forest, I might also carry a small Scandinavian Forest Axe and the whetstone to keep it sharp-that's more of a winter thing than in warmer weather though.  Knowing how to build shelter, and get a fire going in any conditions, will keep you alive, but you need to practice the skills.
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Offline NY Yankee

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Re: Survival Gear
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2019, 11:16:04 AM »
Remember the "10 C's" of survival gear,
1. Cutting Tool (knife)
2. Covering Element ( tarp, poncho)
3. Combustibles (stuff to start a fire)
4. Container (stainless steel water bottle)
5. Cordage (cordage and rope)
6. Compass (and a topo map)
7. Candle Power (headlamp and batteries)
8. Cargo Tape (1" roll Gorilla Tape!)
9. Cotton Cloth (42"x42" 100% cotton bandanna. Lots of uses)
10. Canvas Needle. (large repair needle and floss. Lots of uses)
Also, Combo Tool (a multi tool)
Calories (some snack bars)
Clothing (hooded jacket, knit hat, etc)
These things give you a good basic set of gear to make it on your own for a short time in the wilderness. Most items have multiple uses and even makes it unnecessary to carry a lot of first aid gear if you know how to use the stuff.
Elk don't know how many feet a horse has!

Offline ONE SHOT

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Re: Survival Gear
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2019, 10:28:23 AM »
As a old Hunter of 80 soon to be 81years and 63 some years of Hunting. My number one item to always have on hand is good

old potty paper or paper towel will do. Sure beats grass or worst Poison Ivy. (ONESHOT)

Offline NY Yankee

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Re: Survival Gear
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2019, 11:03:17 AM »
Yes! TP or paper towels should be a staple of outdoor gear. I always have a good handful of paper towels in a Ziploc bag in my pack. Like duct tape, they have a million uses! Thanks Oneshot!
Elk don't know how many feet a horse has!

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