Shooters Forum

Contribute to Trad Gang
Become a Trad Gang Sponsor





Author Topic: Arrow pulls away from Riser  (Read 11152 times)

Offline Raging Water

  • TGMM Member
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ***
  • Posts: 1292
Arrow pulls away from Riser
« on: May 16, 2010, 08:36:00 PM »
I am sure there are already 20 threads on this subject but I will ask anyway.

1) I don't cant the bow very much
2) I shoot three under

What are the main causes for a right handed shooter to have the arrow pull left off the shelf when drawing the arrow back?
Matt

TGMM - Family of the Bow
TG Contributor
All Around Good Guy

Statistically, 6 out of 7 Dwarves are not Happy… which Dwarf do you CHOOSE to be?

Two things that can never be taken back...Harsh Words and Time, Wasted

Offline kodiakkid

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 246
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2010, 10:40:00 PM »
You could try contacting the string a little deeper in your hook whether it be shallow or deep and kinda roll the string to your normal hook. Of course your nocks have to be snug. This will cause the arrow to put a little pressure against the riser thus keeping it on the shelf. Works for me. Paul<><
Always strive to do the right thing. Don't beat yourself down when you mess up. Ask for forgivness and keep on keeping on.

Offline Igor

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 974
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2010, 04:49:00 AM »
IMHO- pulling with your arm instead of your back muscles and or a non relaxed string hand.


><>

Glenn
Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding In all your ways submit to him and he will direct your paths

Offline Ric O'Shay

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 2143
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2010, 06:52:00 AM »
Usually it is caused from not locking your fingers when you start your draw. As you begin to draw, your fingers start to tighten on the string as they attempt to keep the string from slipping off the tips.
Try this, nock an arrow, place your fingers on the string with your hand relaxed. Then begin to close your hand like you are going to make a fist. Bet the arrow just jumps off the shelf doesn't it?

From your previous posts, I know you shoot very heavy bows. Tightening the grip on the string is a common malady with heavy bows. Gotta make a strong hook with your fingers before you begin your draw. Try it and let me know how you do.

Danny
I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just.   - Thomas Jefferson

Offline Eugene Slagle

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 1049
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2010, 07:59:00 AM »
You know Ric O'Shay, I never gave it much thought but you may be on to something because me for instance I shoot with the same deep hook no matter what bow I'm shooting, but when I shoot some one elses bow that is way heavier than I'm used to shoot I do feel myself having a tighter string hand.

Could also be my daughters malady & my solution is sortof a bandaid effect.
Thanx for the info.
Zona Custom Recurve: 60" 49# @ 27.5".
Sky Sky Hawk Recurve: 60" 47# @ 27.5".
Genesis 27:3 Now therefore, please take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field, and hunt game for me.

Online Terry Green

  • Administrator
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ****
  • Posts: 23578
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2010, 08:26:00 AM »
This is very typical of a new shooter just starting out. Hopefully this answer will get you started off correctly.

If you DON'T point your fingers back toward you....when the draw gets heavier, you are curling the fingers back toward you to help you with the weight.....and YOU are rolling the arrow off the shelf.

If you WILL point the fingers back at you to begin with, the weight will make the fingers UNCURL ...keeping the arrow ON the shelf.

I covered all this and reverse cant on The Bowhunters of TradGang DVD's shooting section.
tarz@tradgang.com

"It's important,  when going after a goal, to never lose sight of the integrity of the journey" - Andy Garcia

' An anchor point is not a destination, its  an evolution to execution' - Me

Offline Don Stokes

  • SPONSOR
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ****
  • Posts: 2607
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2010, 09:37:00 AM »
Yep. Deep hook and a relaxed hand. Don't try to pull with your fingers, because it will make them curl and pull the arrow off the shelf. Do it right, and you don't need more than a tiny shelf to keep the arrow off your hand.
Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.- Ben Franklin

Offline Raging Water

  • TGMM Member
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ***
  • Posts: 1292
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2010, 09:53:00 AM »
Thanks guys. I do notice the arrow pulling away when I only use the tips of my fingers. I guess I was thinking that a deep hook affects my release more than using my finger tips.

Gosh, using a deeper hook? Now, I can pull something really heavy! LOL
Matt

TGMM - Family of the Bow
TG Contributor
All Around Good Guy

Statistically, 6 out of 7 Dwarves are not Happy… which Dwarf do you CHOOSE to be?

Two things that can never be taken back...Harsh Words and Time, Wasted

Offline KentuckyTJ

  • SPONSOR
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ****
  • Posts: 8654
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2010, 10:38:00 AM »
Yep as you are drawing you are curling your fingers, which turns the string to the left causing the arrow to go that way. Fingers should not move during draw cycle.
www.zipperbows.com
The fulfillment of your hunt is determined by the amount of effort you put into it  >>>---->

Online Terry Green

  • Administrator
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ****
  • Posts: 23578
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2010, 11:21:00 AM »
Quote
Originally posted by Raging Water:
 I guess I was thinking that a deep hook affects my release more than using my finger tips.
Another thing new shooters think...and shooting off the 'pads'(tips) cause tension and has the reverse effect you would assume it would.

And yes,,....you are correct...with a deep hook vs finger tips, the bow feels 10 pounds lighter.
tarz@tradgang.com

"It's important,  when going after a goal, to never lose sight of the integrity of the journey" - Andy Garcia

' An anchor point is not a destination, its  an evolution to execution' - Me

Offline Raging Water

  • TGMM Member
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ***
  • Posts: 1292
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2010, 01:02:00 AM »
Guys,

Thanks for all the great info!
Matt

TGMM - Family of the Bow
TG Contributor
All Around Good Guy

Statistically, 6 out of 7 Dwarves are not Happy… which Dwarf do you CHOOSE to be?

Two things that can never be taken back...Harsh Words and Time, Wasted

Offline Brently

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 292
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2010, 12:34:00 AM »
Question?  by a deep hook do you mean having the string in the second crook of your finger?

Offline CoilSpring

  • Contributing Member
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ****
  • Posts: 427
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2010, 02:06:00 AM »
Brently, a deep hook can be obtained w/the string in the 1st or 2nd crook, or  b/t them.  Just make sure, like Terry said, your finger-tips are pointing back at you (fingernails parallel to face or side plate of riser) and don't bend your 3rd knuckle into a fist - keep them straight.
CoilSpring

Offline Larry L

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 29
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2010, 12:43:00 AM »
Quote
Originally posted by Terry Green:
If you DONT point your fingers back toward you....when the draw gets heavier, you are curling the fingers back toward you to help you with the wieght.....and YOU are rolling the arrow off the shelf.

If you WILL point the fingers back at you to begin with, the weight will make the fingers UNCURL ...keeping the arrow ON the shelf.

I covered all this and reverse cant on The Bowhunters of TradGang DVD's shooting section.
Thanks for finally explaining "deep hook" in a way I was able to understand.  I've tried and failed to utilize/understand a deep hook on a few occasions and just given up because I couldn't do it right.  Tried it today by "setting and relaxing" and it worked like a charm.

Online Orion

  • Contributing Member
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ****
  • Posts: 7609
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2010, 11:54:00 PM »
Yep.  Reread what Ric  O Shay and Terry have to say.  Folks who've been at this game for a while know what they're talking about.  Pulling the arrow away from the riser is just about the most frequent problem there is for beginning finger shooters.

Offline Arkansas Osage

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 118
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2013, 12:59:00 PM »
Thanks for the great info. One of the kids (12) that I mentor likes to shoot bows but he was having the same problem, the arrow swinging off the shelf to the left. And after watching his drawing hand I was able to see that he was pinching the nock between his fingers and rolling the string to the left as he tightened his grip. By spreading his one over two under fingers a little farther apart and having him get the string a little deeper (first joint groove instead of pads) the problem straightened out. Now I know I did the right thing after reading the expert advice from TG and Ric Oshay. Plus I'll know what to do as I step up in bow weight. I shoot selfbows, osage and hickory, currently at 50#.
"Now take thy weapons, thy quiver of arrows & thy bow & go out to the field, & hunt some venison."

"I caught the caimans on a cane pole baited with hotdogs. I beat them to death with a stick and skinned them with my bare teeth." -dhaverstick

Offline damascusdave

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 3273
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2013, 02:27:00 PM »
With a good deep hook I am able to shoot 60 pounds two fingers under right and left handed...the deep hook is the key
I set out a while ago to reduce my herd of 40 bows...And I am finally down to 42

Offline Training Wheels

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 7
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2013, 10:41:00 PM »
Great newbie pointer, thanks a lot.

Offline xtrema312

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 3163
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2013, 05:11:00 PM »
Yes getting a good hook is key as you start to pull, but you have to have a little relaxing of fingers to pull the arrow a little into the riser.  I trained myself to actually roll my fingers in from the knuckles a little more shooting 3 under as I got on the string. As I started the very early part of my draw I then relax the hand a bit for a little more rotation on the string. You have to be careful not to cup your hand when  you draw past the first inch or so.  

I never had an issue that I can recall shooting split due to more finger contact holding the arrow.  The change from split to 3 under started the issue for me.  I also use to be able to shoot reveres cant easily split, but that is much more difficult 3 under.  Most carbons snap on the sting and once on, will rotate on the string easily.  For me it takes a good bit of pressure from the index finger pushing the arrow nock into the top string nock to keep it from rotating.  Even then it can be hard to keep it on the shelf reverse canting.
1 Timothy 4:4(NKJV)
For every creature of God is good, and nothing is to be refused if it is received with thanksgiving.

Firefly Long Bow  James 4:14
60" MOAB 54@29 James 1:17

Michigan Longbow Association

Offline rollingrock

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 12
Re: Arrow pulls away from Riser
« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2013, 04:39:00 PM »
I had the same problem when I first started shooting traditionals. Over the time I got tuned up by a few good shooters.

Users currently browsing this topic:

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
 

Contact Us | Trad Gang.com © | User Agreement

Copyright 2003 thru 2020 ~ Trad Gang.com ©