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Author Topic: Does it ever really go away?  (Read 1503 times)

Offline Sam McMichael

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Does it ever really go away?
« on: May 29, 2020, 06:41:42 PM »
Since the last week of April, I have been really working on fixing a string plucking issue. I have shot many hundreds of arrows and made a tremendous amount of progress, both with the plucking and with accuracy at longer distance. However, a few shots seem to just go astray, even though they look right and may even feel right. Granted, some shots I just screw up from the get-go, but it is the ones that feel good but fly bad that concern me. You guys that have worked through similar problems, how long was it before you really felt confident that the release would be consistently good?  This is bugging the crap out of me.
Sam

Online McDave

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2020, 08:05:30 PM »
Frankly, I don’t think there is any way that the average archer will ever be as consistent as champions like John Demmer.  I really think they’re wired differently. I have been to every school and class I was interested in, shoot every day, and have all the desire in the world, but just today I plucked several times and had a few unexplained high misses, including one that went over the back of the target. We should always try to improve, and I think I will improve over time, even though I’m 75.  What I won’t do is let the desire to improve beyond my capabilities stand in the way of enjoying myself every time I go out to shoot.
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Offline Twostrings2

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2020, 09:05:14 AM »
  You have confessed to being a plucker and pluckers pluck, it is their nature.  Try
forgetting everything else except getting welded to your anchor point and staying
that way until the arrow hits something. 
 

Offline Sam McMichael

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2020, 09:52:20 AM »
McDave, I think you are right. It seems to just happen from time to time. The worst are those shots that seem to look and feel good at release, but then the results all turn brown and start stinking. I have never been able to freeze at release and hold it until the arrow hits. I think that is part of the problem - I start looking at how beautiful the shot is before the shot is actually on its way. Luckily, I am making many more good shots than I was a few weeks ago. I know 25 yards is not far for a lot of guys, but it is quite a distance for me, as I hunt from 15 to 20 yards. Lengthening the distance is what made me realize just how much plucking was screwing things up. I guess the bottom line is that this bad habit can be minimized but never totally eliminated. Maybe if I blame it on the bow, the wife may let me order a new one, what do you think?
Sam

Online McDave

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2020, 01:37:13 PM »
“I start looking at how beautiful the shot is before the shot is actually on its way.”  I have the same problem, particularly after 3 out of 4 shots go into the 10 ring and I’m about to shoot the 4th shot. It usually helps in this situation to buy a new bow.
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Offline reddogge

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2020, 11:03:44 AM »
My outdoor problem was not only a pluck but a double-clutch once in a while. Oddly I haven't had it happen in a couple of years but I did nothing conscious to get rid of it. I harken back to what my old golf instructor used to drill into my mind. "Good shot beget good shots". The more good shots you make the more you will make. Maybe it's a state of confidence in the mind.
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Offline Sam McMichael

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2020, 10:11:21 AM »
I'm bringing this one back up to say that persistence does pay off. Since I last posted back at the end of May, my release has greatly improved. I still have a few plucks creep in, but, overall, I am shooting a whole lot better. At the same time, I have been trying to extend my shooting distance. At 25 yards I now put most shot into the sweet spot. These accomplishments just show that doing the work brings positive results. I have heavily quarantined during the pandemic, so I have had plenty of time available for practicing. Who else has had a chance to put increased effort into form improvement that showed pleasing results?
Sam

Offline JC Jr

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2020, 02:40:18 PM »
45 years ago a fellow gave me a nugget I’ve never forgotten.  He said, "Time, patience and perseverance will accomplish all things.”

Good for you for hanging in there. 

 :)
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Offline S_Sharp

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2020, 09:28:08 PM »
What everyone else says, ditto. What greatly diminishes the effect of my poor release is to shoot a heavier draw weight bow. I have the most trouble with release from lighter draw weight bows. It’s a balancing act between stability and the string taking before you can screw it up.

Offline Dave Lay

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2020, 12:22:20 AM »
SSharp I agree on the bow weight. I tried to drop bow weight this year from 56 to 45 and had a heck of a time with my release. Ive about decided I suck and am considering going back to my heavier bow. I’m good shooting it , just wanted to try a lighter weight
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Offline Markp

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2020, 08:41:56 PM »
Don't post alot here, or really anywhere, but I am intrigued that more experienced archers undergo similar battles with themselves. My two cents:

I shot judopoints today. Had fun, scouting and shooting. Would check range with laser finder afterwards. Seems more casual, and my form is better than
with a target. NO stress. Often arrows were right next to each other, up to 30 or so yards. just roving...and the body remembers what to do, with the judo points...

Agree with heavier poundage helps release. My string shoulder sort of rebels against anything over 47, 48#. I like 45, 46#.

Offline S_Sharp

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2020, 09:47:01 PM »
Markp you describe exactly how I enjoy shooting. Roving seems to let the arrow to go where you want it. I hope the OP works it out. Being relaxed and no stress is key. I don’t do well standing in front of a target shooting multiple arrows.

Offline scriv

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Re: Does it ever really go away?
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2020, 07:24:13 PM »
Since the last week of April, I have been really working on fixing a string plucking issue. I have shot many hundreds of arrows and made a tremendous amount of progress, both with the plucking and with accuracy at longer distance. However, a few shots seem to just go astray, even though they look right and may even feel right. Granted, some shots I just screw up from the get-go, but it is the ones that feel good but fly bad that concern me. You guys that have worked through similar problems, how long was it before you really felt confident that the release would be consistently good?  This is bugging the crap out of me.

If one uses a deep hook, and utilizes proper back tension in the draw, and anchor there will be much less tension in the drawing hand.  This lack of tension will facilitate a smoother release, and the back tension will draw the hand strait to the rear in a relaxed fashion that will eliminate the plucking.  As someone mentioned, confidence will lead to a more relaxed shot, which leads to a better result, which leads to more confidence...... Another big thing for confidence is to quit while you are doing well.  You will feel better about your shooting when you return.  That is not to say that you should shoot until you get it right, we are not machines, some days it's just not there.  It's better to shoot fewer arrows with good form than to practice poor form. 
Shoot strait and have fun!

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