Author Topic: Probably overlooked  (Read 1337 times)

Offline Cavscout9753

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Probably overlooked
« on: August 10, 2018, 01:20:31 PM »
(Feel free to delete if I’ve missed the intention here)
I know folks are going to list out kit and gear for various hunts based on terrain and climate, but one thing I find with many hunters who push deeper and deeper into remote areas is a lack of first aide skills, particularly trauma first aide. Falls, cuts, infections, and even the bodies inability to adapt fast enough can land folks in trouble. Its not even just yourself that you should consider (self aide is a great skill) but any hunting partners or other hunters you come upon. In those types of situations, the actions of the first people to render (or not render) proper care can greatly effect the outcome one way or another. The Red Cross, some YMCA’s, colleges, or lots of other groups teach great courses with hands on training.
ΙΧΘΥΣ

Macatawa

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Re: Probably overlooked
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2018, 08:22:03 AM »
(Feel free to delete if I’ve missed the intention here)
I know folks are going to list out kit and gear for various hunts based on terrain and climate, but one thing I find with many hunters who push deeper and deeper into remote areas is a lack of first aide skills, particularly trauma first aide. Falls, cuts, infections, and even the bodies inability to adapt fast enough can land folks in trouble. Its not even just yourself that you should consider (self aide is a great skill) but any hunting partners or other hunters you come upon. In those types of situations, the actions of the first people to render (or not render) proper care can greatly effect the outcome one way or another. The Red Cross, some YMCA’s, colleges, or lots of other groups teach great courses with hands on training.

"In those types of situations, the actions of the first people to render (or not render) proper care can greatly effect the outcome one way or another..."

Amen to this!  My younger brother has taken two unplanned dives from his treestand...almost killed him.

First responder training is not difficult to come by and it can make a HUGE difference when trying to decide what, if anything to do when stumbling upon an emergency situation.  The ability to quickly assess a situation (breathing, circulation) is not rocket science and can make the difference in helping or causing permanent damange.

Many years ago my job reqired an EMT certification but that is not necessary to deal with most anything that comes across your path.  I have more often used basic skills you can learn at those YMCA sponsored classes. 

Offline -Zor

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Re: Probably overlooked
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2018, 12:41:59 AM »
Another consideration on top of first aid training is contacting and assisting emergency help. It's good to know what kind of questions will be asked by the operator once you get ahold of emergency service. Your ability to provide accurate information is key. Patient condition, vitals, type of accident, time of accident, if patient is degrading. If it's life threatening; exact location, knowing whether or not a helicopter can land at your location, how to mark a landing zone. When time is critical your ability to aid the phone operator and first responders in an efficient manner will make a difference. There are multiple organizations that offer wilderness first aid courses that will go in depth into first aid and dealing with an emergency in the backcountry.


Online acedoc

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Re: Probably overlooked
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2018, 02:50:32 AM »
Seeing the proclivity for pointed and sharp things we carry, at the very least configuring our clothing with in built tourniquets may be the simplest way to deal with a bleeder.
Also Quicklot can be carried (available online). A well kitted first aid bag is a must in my opinion.
In fact with the wealth of knowledge on the board let's make one up- please contribute as per your opinion.
I am a doctor and carry the following in my car at all times
Otc meds for headache,  cold and loosies, antiemetics and anti histamines (oral and injectable)
Dressing material
Skin stapler, steri strips and superglue
Iv fluids 2 lts
Ors , antibiotics (oral) , pain killer injectable iPods
Adrenaline, atropine and neostigmine
Dopamine
I-gel lma
AMBU bag
Botropase vials for that oozing bleeder
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 11:08:05 AM by acedoc »
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Online SAM E. STEPHENS

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Re: Probably overlooked
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2018, 12:18:35 AM »
First aid is a great skill to learn it’s usually an easy thing that can save a life. I’m a full time firefighter EMT in a big city and I would have to say the biggest lifesaver in any emergency is confidence in you abilities. So take a few classes cause you never know what tomorrow brings.....

,,,Sam,,,
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Online Justin Falon

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Re: Probably overlooked
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2018, 08:14:53 AM »
Great post Sam.
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