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Author Topic: When the Wheels Fall Off  (Read 271 times)

Online BWallace10327

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When the Wheels Fall Off
« on: July 04, 2018, 10:50:06 PM »
I'm not being literal; our bows don't have wheels.  In all seriousness, what happens when everything shootingwise fall to pieces?  I've been on a real hot streak for the past few months.... placing in 3d shoots, never missing my target ball at a wide variety of unknown ranges out to 30+ yards and just last weekend, bettering my 300 indoor score by 7 points and hitting a new high on X count.   Fast forward to this afternoon.  3rd shot, miss left.  I spend the next 2 hours shooting 1 arrow at a time, ending the day with more misses than I've had in 2018 and half of 2017 combined.  One poor shot skipped off the top of the ball and send the arrow to a juniper limb that propelled the arrow off into the wild blue yonder.  All I could do was shake my head.  Please Tradgang, share your experience, help me feel "normal".  :help:  :biglaugh:
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Online McDave

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Re: When the Wheels Fall Off
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2018, 11:30:09 PM »
My experience when this happens is that something has crept into my shooting that I’m oblivious to.  Back tension, creeping, peeking, those have been my issues.  Your’s might be different.  Experts like Rod Jenkins or Rick Welch could spot your problem in just a few shots.  Either find one, or send in a video for Arne to evaluate.  The good thing is that once you learn how to spot it, it won’t stump you again.
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Offline Sam McMichael

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Re: When the Wheels Fall Off
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2018, 10:06:49 AM »
To paraphrase the poet Robert Burns, "The best laid schemes of mice and men often turn brown and start stinking." This, too, shall pass. Spend some time working on form and maybe shoot fewer arrows for a few days to let your mind rest. When you fret too much about this, your concentration may focus on fretting rather than on shooting. Picking a spot, back tension, anchor point, smooth release, etc. will all fall back into place when you loosen up a bit.
Sam

Online BWallace10327

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Re: When the Wheels Fall Off
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2018, 11:03:32 PM »
A day of poor shooting always starts with one bad arrow you never forget (at least for the remainder of that day). The best advice I could give someone in such a scenario is something I should heed myself.  Relax, have fun and don't get stressed out (fretting is a great word).  This happens every now and again.  A few days without shooting and all will be well again.  My form didn't feel any different, but my focus did.  If I could learn one thing to improve my shooting it would be to let a miss go and continue on like it never happened.    No worries now, I took my arrow hound out today and he nosed down my lost arrow.  Thanks for the advice. 
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Online Todd Cook

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Re: When the Wheels Fall Off
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2018, 07:44:08 PM »
"my form didn't feel any different but my focus did". I'm convinced that's about 99.9% of the problems we have when we have a bad day shooting.

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