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Author Topic: Wyoming Pronghorn Spot and Stalk  (Read 138 times)

Offline Ray Borbon

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Wyoming Pronghorn Spot and Stalk
« on: October 18, 2009, 06:37:00 PM »
I was lucky enough to manage my first pronghorn by spot and stalk with my longbow. He's not big but it was a great way for me to once again gain confidence in archery.

 

Offline Blackhawk

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Re: Wyoming Pronghorn Spot and Stalk
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2009, 12:00:00 PM »
Way to go...taking any pronghorn with a trad bow on their terms is quite a feat.  

What bow? any other details too.
Lon Scott

Offline Dale Sharp

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Re: Wyoming Pronghorn Spot and Stalk
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2009, 01:21:00 PM »
Outstanding!
"To me, how you take an animal and how you conduct the hunt, and what you gain from the experience is what bowhunting is all about."
-Jay Massey

Offline Ray Borbon

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Re: Wyoming Pronghorn Spot and Stalk
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2009, 07:10:00 PM »
Ok the details.

We were road hunting outside Glenrock, Wyoming. I spotted him above the road 100 yards along one of the creeks among some sandstone rock terraces. For some reason he must have felt comfortable there. More importantly for me.. he was all alone. Those groups of pronghorns are well aware of their surroundings more than the single critter. My partner kept driving and parked the truck out of sight. I grabbed my bow and arrows. I stalked along the sandstone rock terraces to where I last saw him. I was sure to be real close but didn't see him yet. So I moved my feet around in the sand and he stood out from his bed quartering away directly in front of me at 10 yards. As soon as I saw the horns I started drawing back in anticipation for a shot. When there was enough vitals visible for a shot I let it loose. He took off and wasn't sure what the heck just happened. Except now he wasn't fully functional and probably had a hard time breathing and with balance. I watched him attempt to go uphill for a brief moment and then he ran downhill, let off a couple of noises went over a 8-10 foot cliff down by the creek.

My partner watched everything after the shot. I ran down to the cliff where he was last seen and found my arrow which had worked out of him just before he went over it. The arrow was well placed though because there was a fair amount of leakage. I was sure he wouldn't go too far. Even if he ran like Jesse Owens he couldn't last in his situation. Then we heard something immediately below us moving around in the bushes. I saw him stand and then I got a second shot at him. This was probably about 5-10 yards away and it took him down for good. He expired right along the creek bed. The creek made a good place to clean the meat off. Something also for the local trout population which seemed eager to get at the spoils.

I just ate some for lunch and it was very tasty.

It was definitely a lot of luck to have that situation come together. Road hunting or not. Most of the pronghorn we saw would see us a mile away and start sprinting immediately.

I used a 58 lb @ 28 inches Pacific Yew Take Down Longbow, Magnus Stinger 125 grain broadhead, and Carbon Express Heritage 250 shafts. I am guessing the total arrow weight is around 435 grains.

Offline Nosight

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Re: Wyoming Pronghorn Spot and Stalk
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2009, 09:56:00 AM »
AS said above ...Any speed goat taken with trad gear is a trophy of its own..

Great story and thanks for taking us hunting with you...

Later....Buzz
Remember...aim small miss small...

Offline Dale Sharp

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Re: Wyoming Pronghorn Spot and Stalk
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2009, 03:13:00 PM »
Hey, Ray. The one thing that would have made that picture better would have been to grace it with your beautiful longbow. Next time...
"To me, how you take an animal and how you conduct the hunt, and what you gain from the experience is what bowhunting is all about."
-Jay Massey

Offline Ray Borbon

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Re: Wyoming Pronghorn Spot and Stalk
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2009, 04:04:00 PM »
Thought about it. We had to go around the cliff and down a precarious rock slide in order to get to the animal. So I decided against the bow going down and instead to get our pack and knives. It certainly would not have been that hard to do but I decided to leave it above and to carry my other tools for the harvest at that time. My partner almost did not even follow me down there as it was.

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