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Author Topic: Super Duper Hog info thread  (Read 11459 times)

Offline Bacote Kid

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #60 on: February 09, 2006, 06:38:00 PM »
Solar Hog light if it's legal in your state (Country). Other wise I always hunted full moon nights.
 www.ultramaticfeeders.com  
Then click on feedlight. It's made for hog huntin...You can make your own if you get creative...I've found it just as hard to hunt em at night as in the day sense they don't have the best eyes anyway. Actually I think daylite is easier cause you can see em comin. At night, especially black hogs just appear. If it's a solitary boar they usually slip in and you don't hear em coming like you would a pack of em...
Bob Lee Heavy Weight. Burled Bubinga/Black Micarta 55# @ 28". 58"

Offline Lee in S.C.

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #61 on: February 09, 2006, 07:10:00 PM »
I hunt hogs occasionally here in SC. I like to hunt the waters edge as it recedes in the swamp. The hogs work that edge pretty hard getting acorns and stuff that were covered  while tha water was high. I also hunt the tidal marshes on a flood tide. The high water concentrates the hogs onto high ground, especially in cold weather. I hunt mostly in the afternoon, I kill very few hogs in the AM. They seem to be naturally nocturnal, more so than deer.

Offline Cinghiale

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #62 on: February 09, 2006, 07:16:00 PM »
Thank you B.K....unfortunally here due high hunting pressure wild boars exit at  night only. During the daylight  if you want catch them dogs must be used.
Now I look the link you have suggested.
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In memory of my old hunting partner Silberio : VIVA MARIA !

Offline Bacote Kid

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #63 on: February 09, 2006, 07:32:00 PM »
No problem Cinghiale. Don't take much to turn em all the way nocturnal. Like Lee said, they're pretty much already that way...
Bob Lee Heavy Weight. Burled Bubinga/Black Micarta 55# @ 28". 58"

Offline Jumper

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #64 on: February 09, 2006, 09:44:00 PM »
Just a couple of thoughts here guys.

1) A hog’s nose is hard to beat. Try using a smell that they have trouble resisting if you want to hold them in an open shooting lane for the shot. Mind you, an older hog isn't going to stay long so make it happen. Poke small holes in the aluminum seal on a plastic bottle of vanilla extract. Next use it as a squeeze bottle/sprayer and lightly spray the area you want the hog to stop in. If you have the time, spray it on some corn and let it sit over night before putting it out. Another trick here is to dig a trough and burry the corn. They will stay in the area longer to dig up every last kernel. If a group of herd hogs comes in like Curtis mentioned earlier, they will make enough noise that in some cases a dominant hog will also come in to take over the food source. Be patient and see if one shows up if herd hogs are at your bait. Second scent that they can't seem to resist is Raspberry Jell-O mix. Got to love that one huh. I learned that one from a Texas Biologist who used it to bait traps. Seems they are willing to ignore the human scent left on a steel trap to some extent when they smell the Raspberry powder sprinkled in the trap bottom. Give it a try, I have and filled the freezer on more than one occasion.

2) If you don't want to go the attractant or bait route, stalking is a very viable option on hogs. Lots of fun too! Look in the shady, thick, cool areas during mid day. If you can combine that with a water source, you have hit pay dirt brother! Circle down wind, slip off your boots, and ease in there. Just take your time, don't rush it. Even if they get nervous and leave, sometimes they will filter right back into their mid-day haven. Good camo with a large open pattern is key here. Hogs seem to look right through you if you are wearing something like ASAT or Predator. Just try to stay in or partially in the shadows.

3)  A bow that is pulling 45# or better should be good on most hogs. The larger boars will be a lot tougher but if you’re mindful to keep those shots low and forward, you will be in the money. Remember that a hog’s heart is just behind that front leg and below the scapula. On that note, keep your shots low. Too high and you won't get the penetration on a larger hog. Two blade cut on contact head. Heavy and sharp. Don't sacrifice good flight for weight though. Better to have a straight in hit that goes deep rather than an arrow that is flopping all over the place loosing energy that results in poor penetration.

4) Follow up after the shot. Mark the spot you took the shot and the spot the hog was standing when you hit him. Sounds simple but it isn't in the heat of the moment. Listen and don't move. Fix the last sound you hear the hog make and use it as a reference later if the blood trail gives out. You would be amazed at just how little they can bleed even with a good hit. Heavy fat layers, thick hide, it all adds up. Again, low and forward to put it in the boiler will lead to a fast recovery.  

5)  Leather gloves. You would be amazed at just how many prickly pear spines will be sticking out of a Texas hog! They will mess you up fast if you’re not careful. The gloves also give you a better grip for dragging and help protect you when you’re squeezing through the lovely prickly pear patches.

  Just a few thoughts, hopefully some of the other Texas Sweat guys will weigh in here also. Between them, a lot of pork has hit the dirt!
"With God, all things are possible"

Online Terry Green

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #65 on: February 09, 2006, 10:46:00 PM »
Great thread.....lots of info that is international.....and some local fine tuning.

Keep it coming.
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Offline CJ5

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #66 on: February 09, 2006, 11:06:00 PM »
Excellent thread. I'm getting alot of great schooling on hog hunting. We have a few here, and getting more, but nothing like further south. Most people here rifle hunt them with dogs. I'd like to see more info on techniques for mountainous terrain and maybe some field dressing/processing stuff whenever we get to an appropriate place in the thread.

Offline slow walker

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #67 on: February 09, 2006, 11:16:00 PM »
Some have sort of alluded to this but let's say you have a good shot at a larger hog...150 lbs. and up.  What are the safety precautions you should think about?  I dreampt of shooting a really big boar last night.  In my dream I shot him in the "wrong" place and he came right after me.  I spent the next several minutes (until I woke up) runnin my arse off and wishin for a tree I could climb.  (Of course in real life, I'd just pull my Doug C. sheath knife and say to him "come on punk, make my day", but this was a dream you see.   :bigsmyl:

Offline Scott G

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #68 on: February 09, 2006, 11:33:00 PM »
I've shot a few hogs here in TX but only barely into the double digits and I don't have anywhere near the knowledge on this subject as most of the people posting here.  That said, here are some observations from my limited experience.

I have always been one to use two bladed broadheads sharpened to a mirror, razor edge.  Don't know if this is a problem anyone else has had, but I usually end up with skimpy blood trails when shooting hogs.  Next time out I'm going to try Wensel Woodsmans and see if they do any better, unless its a really big hog.

Something I have observed at feeders, sometimes when you shoot a "herd hog" as Curtis puts it, they don't always take off in different directions but actually seem to have a freakin escape route...they all haul bacon in the same direction down the same trail.  When this happens I swear a fatally shot hog can run 100 yards after it's dead just to keep up with the group.  Shot a 40# hog that ran over 300 yards, keeping up with the herd, after center punching the heart with a razor sharp magnus.  When I unzipped him the chest cavity was full of blood but he left a real skimpy blood trail.

Also, after putting a good shot on a hog if they don't get to far you might hear them make a death moan.  Listen for it and make a note where it comes from, it might help in retrieval.

Offline Scott G

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #69 on: February 09, 2006, 11:53:00 PM »
Slow Walker,

None of the hogs I've killed have been over 150 lbs so take this for what it's worth.

I think most hogs just want to get away when you shoot them.  Probably the most dangerous time is when your tracking a mortally wounded hog, it's decided to find a place to lay down and die but you won't leave him alone and his mind set changes from flight to fight.

Offline beachbowhunter

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #70 on: February 09, 2006, 11:54:00 PM »
Quote
Originally posted by the Ferret:
A note about hogs, they never stop moving for more than a second or two unless they are bedded or sense something isn't right.  If close to a hog, expect to make a quick shot because he is only going to offer perfect shots for a very small time frame before turning one way or another. I mean like a second.  
Ferret you took the words right out of my mouth! They are always moving, expecially on the front end. You need to be ok with taking a shot at a moving target. And unlike a whitetail, a grunt wont hold them. They bolt with no second glance.
Ishi was a Californian                   :cool:

Offline tippit

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #71 on: February 10, 2006, 06:58:00 AM »
This is such a great thread.  I've never hunted hogs before but the similarity to bear hunting (except the herd aspect) is amazing.  I'm loving this...thanks!  Just curious, has anyone used annise or liquid smoke with vanilla?  Jeff
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Offline the Ferret

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #72 on: February 10, 2006, 07:16:00 AM »
It should be noted there are several species of hogs and they have different characteristics and temperaments.

The Spanish descendent hogs found in Florida and south Texas are runners and not fighters for the most part and hunters have little to fear in the way of charges unless you are standing in their flight path. They tend to be of smaller stature and body weights as well. A 200 pounder is a big one and a 300 pounder is practically unheard of. A true direct descendant pure Spanish hog may have what they call wattles, 2 fleshy flaps hanging under their jowls. I have only shot one of these. I have also shot one that had "mule feet", supposedly another rare trait of the Spanish hog.

The European hogs or Russians as some are called are larger and more aggressive and will chase you down and try and put a hurting on you. These can grow into the 400 pound and up range. I'm not sure where these live except I think they live in Tenn, Ark, maybe the Carolinas? I think they refer to these locally as Piney Woods rooters.

The 2 species besides size, are different in hair, snout length, ear shape, and tail shape. The Spanish tend to also have a flat back line and the Europeans have a sloped back line with the haunches lower than the front shoulders.

Like a deer a hog can go from standing still to full speed running in about 3 steps. I wouldn't call them blazing fast, but you are not going to outrun one. We have chased hogs that didn't stop running for 2 miles thru the Palmetto swamps.
There is always someone that knows more than you, and someone that knows less than you, so you can always learn and you can always teach

Offline Charlie Lamb

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #73 on: February 10, 2006, 08:44:00 AM »
With pretty limited experience hog hunting I don't have a lot to add and lots to learn here.

I'd say that if there was ever a time when good optics paid for themselves it would be hog hunting.

Once those oinkers bed they can be hard to see regardless of cover type. I know around Curtis, they like to brush up in cockleburr thickets and under grandfathers beard... both very thick.

Use your binocs to pick apart cover, looking for patches of hair.

For me, at least, getting down low to scan under thick overhanging brush helps. What often appears as a wall of solid brush actually has a center and it's clear under there... but pretty dark compared to outside.
Patience is a virtue.

As far as dealing with an aggressive animals, I have this plan. (like Mike Tyson said, "everyone has a plan until they get hit)  :D
A pig comes for me and he's gonna get a face full of arrow. I don't run or climb all that well.

Howard Hill used to bait them into a charge and then jump to the side... hogs don't turn all that fast... then he'd shoot them going away.
I did that very thing years ago on my very first hog... around 1967. Much more agile then!

They also don't jump all that well, so I guess you wouldn't need to get all that far off the ground if you had a tree handy.
Hunt Sharp

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Offline JC

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #74 on: February 10, 2006, 09:07:00 AM »
Most of ya'll are way ahead of me on hog knowledge but I'll add this in that has already been mentioned:

Shot placement is critical for hogs, they don't usually bleed a whole lot in my experience and have a great zest for life. Too far forward is better than too far back, just behind or above the elbow entrance with exit between the front legs somewhere will drop em like a hot horseshoe...or as mickey stated, hard quartering away between the last rib and hip entrance, exit between front legs somewhere. Mickey and others also stated they are in constant movement. A quick (yet still accurate) shot is an asset.

Ray touched on most of the hog behavior I have experienced locally: they roam a great deal and if you can find food areas to hunt to and between, I think it improves your odds of success.

Their eyesight may not be as keen as a whitetails but don't underestimate it, they key on movement very easily, though do seem to have some issue with picking out human form in camo. But their nose seems to be a whitetails better.

I prefer to hunt them spot and stalk, into the wind of course, while they are feeding/rooting. I poked a pig once it was making so much noise feeding it didn't hear me slip right up too it...course I doubt you'll do that with one of any size but they are sometimes so singleminded, and so loud in a group, getting to a shot can happen very quickly if you are agressive and use the wind correctly.

They are my favorite animal to hunt with a stickbow by far.

Now....on with the wisdom from the experts....I'm still soakin this thread in.
"Being there was good enough..." Charlie Lamb reflecting on a hunt
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Offline CJ5

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #75 on: February 10, 2006, 09:07:00 AM »
Ferret.......Yeah, european boars from the Urel  mtns. were transplanted in the Hooper's bald area near Robbinsville, N.C. Supposedly, it was one of the earliest introductions in the U.S., but this I dont know for sure. The ones here sure do look fearsome though  :scared:  .

Offline Littlefeather

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #76 on: February 10, 2006, 09:18:00 AM »
Wow! You guys bring up some great points that I wasn't thinking about covering. Night hunting, Lights, dressing hogs, gear, trail timers, recovery time, etc. Whew, where do we start?

My night hunt really well until 8:55pm when 9 good sized hogs come running by. I stopped them with a grunt and as the entire herd bunched up, I could only make out one big blob of black. The Moon had gone behind the clouds and thwarted my shot opportunity. They stood still for a solid 10 seconds and then continued of their nightly rituals. Maybe tonight will prove more fruitful. Let me get some coffee and we'll contine on down the path of piggy profiles. CK

Offline citori

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #77 on: February 10, 2006, 09:23:00 AM »
Hey.....I have been lurkin and reading this site for a while, and decided to get involved.  I am also fairly new to traditional archery.  I have been fooing with it for a while but just got serious about it in the last year or so.

I am from southeast Missouri.  We have a growing population of hogs here.  I have killed 3 this past year, and am getting into hunting them pretty heavy.  They are mostly on public land, and expanding the range at a good rate.

I took the jaw from my first hog and went to texasboars and aged it.  It has the tooth between the cutters and molars in the lower jaw that the website says means it is a hybrid.  They look almost pure russian to me.  Huge long head and front shoulders, and small waist with shorter hams.  LONG hair on the back and a 10" hairy tail.

The boar that I killed was @160# and I aged him at 3 years old.  The other two were sows and were @225# and 140#.

I am VERY interested in all this info that you guys have talked about so far.  I am hunting around a large lake that is very hilly.  I put out bait at a wallow and have had little luck.  

They seem to be VERY inactive during the day and lay up in heavy thickets. There is a LOT of pressure on the hogs from people hunting.  We had a VERY good acorn crop this year and they dont have to move much at all to get all they need to eat.  

I love this thread......it is the most info on hog hunting that I have ever seen.

thanks for listening to me ramble on   :D   hog hunting just gets me excited!!!!!

thanks
citori

Offline Littlefeather

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #78 on: February 10, 2006, 11:26:00 AM »
I've just gone through and reread everything posted so far. I must admit that I now feel like we've only scratched the surface of all we need to talk about. I suppose we'll talk a bit about where to find hogs now. This will be the hardest of the subjects due to Geographic differences between your area and mine.

Im a South Texas hog hunter. Here in south Texas the lay of the land is almost featureless. My hunting areas are generally flat with the only elevation changes being along creeks, streams , and rivers. It is here where these elevation changes occur that I seem to find the more piggy sign.

Hogs are just an animal not unlike many of the other animals in the woods. They need the very things that every other animal needs and in many ways act the same in their daily/nightly routine. Eat, drink, sleep, and breed. Pretty simple isn't it? Not really!

Bedding areas: I find the greatest majority of the bedding areas in the cool, damp environments just out of the river bottoms and around the high edges of pond banks. Generally the bedding takes place along a ridge adjacent to a water source or wetland area where the pig can stay cool and still have the vantage of the best wind. These ridges may be a 5' rise in elevation a 100 yards away from water or a ridge 10" from the water. It doesn't have to be a big ridge, just a high point. Of course, if you've got a 50' ridge running parallel to a creek and is in close proximity, I think you will find bedding sign along it. The ridges that have an East facing direction will be your #1 choice in the entire area. This is going to be especially true in the winter and in areas where cold weather is dominant. Hogs generally feed at night and are quite cold by morning. They wish to lounge in the warmth of the rising, morning Sun.
Another type of bed is the dry dirt bed. I spoke a little about them earlier. You'll find these type beds as well as the moist beds. The dry beds are areas where the pigs are dusting themselves for parasites. They look quite similar to the moist beds but will be a bit harder to spot.

Feeding areas: This can be any natural or manmade food source including crops such as beens and corn. Also in some regions the hogs will forage grasslands, The grasslands look like an unlikely spot to you and I but under the ground will hold tubers which hogs will root for and feed on. Fruit and nut trees will also draw hogs. The areas with one or two fruit trees are only going to be a Snack Bar along the route. Hogs will hit them but with much less frequency than areas of greater food sources. What you are looking for is an area with a vast support system of food. Something that will easily support a group of hogs and not one or two hogs. This of course will also be a regional thing.

Water sources: These are likely spots to ambust hogs but can vary in results depending on the amount a water available within the region. If there is little water and it is far between, water is an amazing possibility in hunting hogs.

Sign posts: Hogs leave sign posts everywhere the travel. Once you've taught yourself what you are looking for you will find that hogs have been leaving you tidbits of information all over the place. You must adjust yourself to start reading the sign. Hogs bed generally in one direction. Here you can see which way the have been facing so that you may approach the bed properly next time. This is especially true of dominant, lone boars. Hogs scratch on trees and make sign posts. You can tell how tall the hogs are and what direction they are traveling by watching the bases of the trees and seeing which side they've been rubbed on. Hogs leave mud here and will sometime polish trees to a glossy sheen if they are used often. Feces will also tell you the direction of a hogs travel and how long its been since he was there. If the feces is still moist and warm, Id say you are relatively close to a hog! LOL!
 
Breeding: This is the least of your worries when hog hunting. It happens at all times of the year and never ends. There is no way that I know of to pattern hogs around breeding. I would consider this a secondary issue when hog hunting.

My overview in a nutshell: If you have an area where cropland in divided my a creek or river, you will certainly want to hunt along the brushy areas there. Hogs will be laid up in the heat of the day and will be bedding here. In the late evenings and at night, they will generally hit a water source and then continue on to feed in the fields. Of course there are so many variations on geographic and regional changes that I cannot even hope to cover a small percentage of these. You'll have to do some of your own foot work here and implement some of what we have talked about such as scents, baits, etc. to locate your quary. I cannot stress enough that hogs will bed on the East side of hills and ridges in the mornings. I've seen this over and over. I've also flown over bedded hogs on many occasions while flying with a friend. I see hohs bedded on open, desolate hill tops where I would have never looked. Don't overlook the obvious due to your extreem concentration on other things. Cover all the bases. The other thing I will say is that hogs in many, many areas are nomatic due to lesser food sources and less conducive areas to inhabitate. If you can't find a hog on any given 500 acre tract of land in your area, you do not have a hog overpopulation problem. You instead have huntable numbers but not an epidemic. Here in South Texas we are experiencing an epidemic and I fear that someone is going to start trying new measures to erradicate the species. Im gonna take a break now. Any questions or input? CK

Offline Shaun

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Re: Super Duper Hog info thread
« Reply #79 on: February 10, 2006, 11:32:00 AM »
A cleaning note; to peel a hog, make another skin cut down the back or on a very large hog cut the skin in stips from head to tail. Makes it much easier to pull off. Use a utility knife with a roofers' hook blade to cut the hide.

Been told that a charging hog will keep going if you manage to sidestep his charge. Heard that a javie will turn and keep after you. I can jump higher than a hog, but my hang time is not too good. Nothing to climb in south TX that is not full of thorns. Make the first arrow a good one!

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