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Author Topic: Snap shooting vs anchor point  (Read 2467 times)

Offline venisonburger

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Snap shooting vs anchor point
« on: August 30, 2006, 01:53:00 PM »
I found by accident that if I draw and release with a floating anchor that my accuracy increases, when I anchor at the corner of my mouth my consistency decreases noticably. Why would this be? you would think that a set point each time would ensure more consistent results right?
What is the opinion out there and what do you use?
VB
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Offline Peachey

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2006, 02:43:00 PM »
I am exactly the opposite. If I hold at anchor 2 or 3 seconds I shoot much better.

Offline Tom Leemans

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2006, 03:17:00 PM »
By floating you mean.....?

If your anchor is inconsistent, your accuracy should be too.

Just curious, when coming to full anchor (corner of mouth), are you straining at all?
Got wood? - Tom

Offline vermonster13

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2006, 03:23:00 PM »
I know where Tom is headed and I think he may be right. Being able to draw a certain weight bow isn't the same as being able to shoot it. Sounds like you may be a little overbowed if you're getting those results.
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Offline gordonf

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2006, 03:27:00 PM »
I firmly believe that one should be able to acheive the same result no matter how long the hold (within reason, of course). If you cannot, then you are not in full control of your shot IMO.

Offline kawika b

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2006, 03:36:00 PM »
hey dave,,,you should start the "mistakes" thread here bro. many things overlooked.
Nana ka maka;
ho`olohe ka pepeiao;
pa`a ka waha.

Observe with the eyes;
listen with the ears;
shut the mouth.

Thus one learns>>>------>TGMM Family of the Bow

Offline Tom Leemans

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2006, 03:43:00 PM »
Exactly verm. Maybe short drawing the bow is easier on his bow arm.
Got wood? - Tom

Offline vermonster13

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2006, 03:51:00 PM »
Without actually seeing him shoot, that would be my guess. He hits his comfort point and lets go, that would be the moment before he passes into where he begins to lose control. snap shooting should still be from full draw with a solid form, just done quickly.
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Offline sar

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2006, 04:42:00 PM »
The longer I hold, the better I shoot.  Don't know why it is.  Mebbe I got slow instinct! I'm not trying to "aim" or line up the arrow.

I'm no compound shooter, but I think I might've held my bob lee for upwards of 20 seconds before letting go on some difficult 3d shots.  Drawing to 57 or 58# is ok with that, but I can't hold as long when I have my 70's on-I'm good for 10 seconds I'd guess.

The guy who's helped me out with my shooting a lot is responsible for my moving away from snap shooting.  If I get tired or lazy and start to snap, my accuracy immediately drops.

Online rabbitman

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2006, 04:47:00 PM »
Moving this thread to the shooter's forum

Offline swampbuck

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2006, 04:58:00 PM »
Well guys the first thing that popped in my head was over bow'd LOL I shoot better when I slow up a bit allowing the sight picture to settle as I pull thru the anchor.

Your anchor is basically your rear sight...if it floats.....
Shoot straight and have FUN!!

Offline justin snyder

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2006, 06:50:00 PM »
Thats funny, I read the post about anchoring and pulling through and the first thing that popped into my head was "your pulling through when you dont stop to anchor, but when you stop you just let go" That was my problem for a couple years. I watched a bunch of movies and read everything I could find before I figured it out why I was shooting OK but never great.  Justin

Offline venisonburger

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2006, 07:00:00 PM »
I guess when I say floating, I mean I don't come to a point where my finger is in the corner of my mouth or any other specific point, it seems like I am able to site through the arrow and find it going where I am looking. I think the other way I was shooting was more instinctive and I looked at what I wanted to hit and not the arrow itself. Does this make any sense at all? As far as being overbowed, maybe, I have had shoulder problems for some time and have alot of pain with them. I don't know that I want to continue this type of shooting, but it seemed strange that my groups tightened alot. the closest thing I could compare it to is like an indian draw on a short bow, pulling towards your body and sighting down the arrow and releasing before you get to your face.  VB
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Offline MBurns

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2006, 07:01:00 PM »
Mark I shoot the same way. I tried a solid anchor and for the life of me can't achieve the accuracy I want. I shoot in the set arm method and slowly draw till my drawing hand is past my eye and then release. It works and works very well for me. At 46# draw weight I'm not overbowed. I do however practice by drawing and holding for a few seconds on target and then let down to retain muscle memory for my release. Hey it works fer me.

Offline Ron Vought

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2006, 11:24:00 AM »
I draw the bow slowly and just touch the corner of my mouth for a split second with my  middle finger. Been doing this for years and seems to work. When I try to hold anchor for any length of time my accuracy suffers and it just doesn't feel comfortable to me. The "touch and go" type of shooting could cause you to not hit anchor everytime. I find myself every now and again floating my anchor (snap shooting) as well but most time I am consistently touching the corner of my mouth.

Ron

Offline doctorbrady

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2006, 06:21:00 PM »
I am going to stick my neck out and say that I believe that EVERYBODY has the ability to shoot better with a solid anchor and hold.  My intention here is not to ruffle the feathers of my snap shooting friends.  It simply stands to reason that with a consistent, reproduceable form and solid anchor one's shots will be more consistent and accurate as well.  This is true whether you "aim" as a gap shooter or shoot instinctively.  You will rarely if ever see a top finalist in any of the large 3-D shoots who snap shoots the target.  It just doesn't build repeatable consistency.  The exception to this rule is if a guy is overbowed and can't control the bow due to the fact that it is too heavy or if one suffers so terribly from target panic that they are unable to control the bow upon release.  Imagine a rifle shooter who claimed to shoot better at long range targets from the hip or with a rapid freehand draw than off a stable rest.  It seems incredulous.  Yet as traditional bowhunters we attempt to defy what is common sense by making ourselves believe that something magical happens with a stickbow that allows us to shoot better when we are rushing the shot.  If you are a gap shooter then you are certainly better off settling into your target and getting your point of reference than you are slinging off an arrow when it gets close.  If you are an instinctive shooter, as I am, you are always better off giving your brain a second or two to fine tune your mental "sight picture" before you release the arrow.  This also serves to better lock in the "sight picture" and "muscle memory" that you use to shoot at various distances.  I saw Rick Welch demonstrate this well about a year ago while he was visiting me.  He drew on the target and told me when he acquired the target.  It took less than a second.  He fired a few arrows this way and shot reasonably well by any standard.  However, when he gave his brain a couple of seconds to fine tune the shot, his arrows slammed home with precision time after time.  With the proper training and bow weight I am convinced that this style of shooting will always be more consistent than snap shooting.  Brady

Offline venisonburger

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #16 on: September 01, 2006, 01:27:00 AM »
I tried it again, shot arrows with a couple different anchor points, one that I used for a long time, some that I never used, and then the floating type, the best was the floating, I was in the kill zone at different distances, angles, and actually slapping arrows together. My attempts with anchor points was less than impressive, I guess I'll work with this for awhile, see if it wavers, with deer season a few weeks off I don't want to get any negative issues in my brain, for now this is working I'm gonna run with it.
VB
I'm not a woodworker, I don't know why God chose me to make bows.

Offline Traxx

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #17 on: September 01, 2006, 02:35:00 AM »
VB,
What it also could be,is that when you come to anchor,at the corner of yer mouth,you could be settlein.What i mean by that is,when you hit that anchor,you stop pulling,and relax back tension.I had a bout with this.When you dont stick the finger in the corner,you keep pulling with back tension,and get a cleaner release.
Target archery is seeing how far away you can get and still hit the bull's eye. Bowhunting is seeing how close you can get and never miss your mark.

Offline Josh_IOWA

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2006, 09:27:00 AM »
Venison, if you start changing your anchor point it will treat you bad!  If you ask anymore questions, next week you'll be shooting 3under and asking questions about some book.  If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
Later, Josh.  # 4143

Offline JC

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Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2006, 10:16:00 AM »
Well, as the famous line goes "opinions differ."

Just because you shoot quickly, doesn't mean you aren't in control, or don't have a consistent anchor. I will agree that the majority of shooters are better served with a "hold" type shot, but not everyone.

Your analogies are somewhat skewed in my opinion. If we were talking about shooting at 90 meters, I would liken that to your sniper example. If we were target shooting, I'd probably, at least partially, concede your point. However, at 10 yards in a hunting situation, it's much more like the quick draw. Ever see Bob Munden, famous quick draw and trick shot specialist, shoot? His accuracy certainly doesn't suffer from his speed. He's trained himself to do it right, but quickly. The same can be done with archery gear.

Does a baseball pitcher hold at any point during his pitch (though he does concentrate deeply on his target before his "draw" as many fast shooters do)? Does the quarterback pause at any point? What about basketball players? Hockey players, golf players? If they can do it, my question is, why can't anyone else? It's obvious the human mind and body can be trained to do some amazing feats, and with practice, at speeds that seem impossible to those who do it differently.

To some of us, it's not rushing the shot....it's the perfect pace for the shooter who doesn't hold at anchor (that's implying he's reaching anchor). To some of us, the shot is the entire time...from the acquisition of the target until the arrow hits....aiming is happening the entire time...once the arrow reaches anchor, there is no need to tary...all the fiddling in the world won't make any difference if the shooter is on target already.

Rick welch is an incredible shooter, of that I have no doubt. But what works for Rick, or Howard Hill, or Ron LaClair or anyone else does not necessarily mean it works for everyone.

Take a look at how Guru (Curt Cabrera) shoots. He barely pauses at anchor....let's see, he won the latest muzzy shoot. Watch Terry Green shoot...I'm not sure he's missed an animal in the last 2 years, and he's killed quite a few (and I'm glad he doesn't spend a lot of time at the tournaments I frequent).

Everyone should develop a style that best fits them. If it works, keep at it. If it doesn't, try something new. But don't be afraid to try something everyone else says doesn't work...cause everyone else may be wrong....at least about it working for you.

Your mileage may vary   ;)
"Being there was good enough..." Charlie Lamb reflecting on a hunt
TGMM Brotherhood of the Bow

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