INFO: Trad Archery for Bowhunters



Author Topic: Asbell style  (Read 1488 times)

Offline bodkin

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 14
Asbell style
« on: November 21, 2003, 05:47:00 AM »
Is his style effective ?Just got hold of all of his works,a video and three books.This style looks rother wild,what do you think ?


b.

Offline Bowhunter57

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 41
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2003, 07:16:00 AM »
bodkin,
What's "wild" about Fred G. Asbell's style?

I shoot almost exactly the same way (I tend to hold my anchor for a few seconds, before releasing) and I don't see anything radical about the style. Archery is a personal sport, people are different and the combination of the two makes it very enjoyable.  ;)

I shot with a guy on a 3-D course that just before he would release, he's drop his bow arm rather quickly (about 4 to 5 inches) and then restore it to it's orginal location and release the string. I didn't understand that method/ style, but it worked for him, because he was deadly accurate. This style of shooting is against all of the "rules" for proper form, but like I said, "it worked for him".  :D

Good hunting, Bowhunter57
There is no hunting like the hunting of man, and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never care for anything else thereafter. - Ernest Hemingway

Offline Ben Woodring

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 147
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2003, 07:24:00 AM »
I'm not up to speed on the textbook styles...could you explain...I'd be happy to compare it to my style and those I shoot with.

Online Roger Norris

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 3294
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2003, 07:27:00 AM »
Read it again. Nothing wild about it. He will tell you himself that you don't need to release as quick as he does, if it doesn't feel right.
"I think wolves would find me stringy, of high cholesterol, with an Irish whiskey aftertaste"
 www.Tradwoodsman.com  What the heck is an Arrow Canoe?

Offline RayMO

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 529
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2003, 07:32:00 AM »
Nothing wild that I see. I have both of his books and the video. If books could make you a good shoot I would be one of the best  :D  . Fred, is right on with the basics of good form. Take what works for you.

Offline Ben Woodring

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 147
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2003, 07:43:00 AM »
just corresponded with a friend that had personal intruction with Asbell, said it was a help but that  Asbell didn't actually shoot like he said a person should??  I think that shows we all start with basics but develop a unique style that can't really be defined or taught

Offline Moe Monsarrat

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 7
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2003, 08:56:00 AM »
I think the wildest thing about G. Fred's style is his grip. My God, how does he shoot like that? I tried his two fingered grip once & the bow jumped out of my hand & wiggled around on the ground for a while. Other than that, I watched his video & really enjoyed it. Very helpful.

Offline Jason R. Wesbrock

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 2509
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2003, 09:31:00 AM »
Two of the deadliest 3D shooters I know are split-finger / canted bow / instinctive archers. So I guess the answer is yes, it can be extremely effective.

Offline Dave Bulla

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 1765
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2003, 09:51:00 AM »
Well, I guess I'll be the first one here to offer a somewhat dissenting opinion...  Or perhaps a better term would be a word of caution?

That style can and does work incredibly well for many people but I honestly believe that it can also lead to target panic in many shooters.  I'm not sure why except that maybe too many of us try to shoot quickly before we are ready.  It sucked me in with that I know.  Fred does talk about proper form in his books (I've only read the first one so can't be sure of the other) but throughout the book he keeps bragging about all the awkward positions, half drawn, floating anchor type shots where he's killed animals and it left me, as a beginner, with the impression that the form part didn't really matter.  That's just not the case.

In two years time I had more bad habits than you could count.  My draw had gone from almost 31" down to about 26" and I couldn't hold at anchor on a target I intended to shoot at to save my life.

Now I can't honestly blame all that on G. Fred but being the "icon" that he is and reading his stories just reinforced my (then uneducated and uninformed) belief at the time that you could just "grip it and rip it" if you just concentrated hard enough on the spot you wanted to hit.  All the 'instinctive' jargon gets repeated over and over again by 90% of the writers in the business but few ever stress proper form in a way that places the proper importance on it.

I've had to totally change my shooting style and really work on the basics of form to correct the bad habits I picked up along the way.  I can hit a solid anchor every time if I pause before the shot but I still have trouble relaxing and holding on target.  For some people it doesn't matter if they start out shooting instinctively or not.  They just naturally have good form and never develop any problems.  For myself and a lot of other shooters I know, especially ones who had no one to teach us and who had to rely on what we read, things would have been much better if we'd learned and stressed proper form and maybe practiced an aiming method to start out and then  WHEN WE WERE PROFICIENT started easing into an instinctive style.  

I've said it before and I'll say it again, I believe instinctive shooting is a goal more than it is a method and proper form is needed as a foundation before you can master it.

As for the books?  They are a great read and have lots of great info.  Just make sure to read and reread the chapters on form and PRACTICE PROPERLY!

Dave
Dave


I've come to believe that the keys to shooting well for me are good form, trusting the bow to do all the work, and having the confidence in the bow and myself to remain motionless and relaxed at release until the arrow hits the mark.

Online Hackbow

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 529
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2003, 10:02:00 AM »
Dave Bulla......email me at Hackbow1@cs.com

As for Asbell's method(s). I shot better after reading the second book and applying a few things he suggested. I still have aspects of my old shooting style that I liked and therefore kept 'em.

Mess around with a bunch of different ways of doing things and have fun. You know I've taught both my boys to shoot, but none of the three of us use exactly the same style. I don't try to correct them as much as guide them. That's how I've used Asbell's and other's information.

Make it fun!

Offline Naked in NH

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 32
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2003, 10:03:00 AM »
"If one could learn by watching, then a dog would be the best butcher"
-Hungarian Proverb

Getting advice and seeing it done is valuable, but shooting style is very personal and needs some experimentation.  Watching your own form will likely improve shooting more than anything, I'd guess.
-pablo
making shavings in the 603

Online Roger Norris

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 3294
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2003, 10:10:00 AM »
I asked Fred directly about the difference between his style and mine....mainly the fact that he releases almost immediatly, while I may hold a few seconds more, and am not always consistent in the time length of my hold at anchor. He commented that if you accept the brain as the "computer" in the shooting equation, it is not incorrect for the brain to take more or less time to calculate the shot, depending on how often you have duplicated that exact shot. For example, I tend to shoot quickly from the ground out to about 20 yards, but beyond that, or from a tree, I hold longer.Basic form is important, but your own style should emerge eventually.

By the, I am not speaking for Fred, just relaying a conversation we had.
"I think wolves would find me stringy, of high cholesterol, with an Irish whiskey aftertaste"
 www.Tradwoodsman.com  What the heck is an Arrow Canoe?

Online Ray Lyon

  • Contributing Member
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ***
  • Posts: 3310
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2003, 10:25:00 AM »
Pablo has a great point about watching yourself shoot. Many of the top golf academy's have video taping of your swing and then it's reviewed with the pro and you go back out and swing some more, maybe changing a thing or two.

You can do the same thing by taping yourself with a home video camera. It's been said that you can't perform a hand eye cordination thing well, until you can visualize yourself doing it well. I think there's probably some truth to this and it's aluded to in Roger Norris' conversation with G. Fred, when they talk about the brain being programmed.

 I also like Larry Yein's article's on perfect practice and shooting up close to the bales with your eye's closed to train your body what is the correct "feel" to a shot. In doing this, you are ignoring aiming and just concentrating on correct form. John Schultz says in his video about the Hill style "proper form is the basic foundation of good shooting. If your form is right you won't be too far off target at 50 yards" (that's paraphrase from memory).

Anyway, I think all the top shooters have a consistant form that they work on and hold as gospel. I've shot 3D and practiced in deer camp with G. Fred, and he's an excellent shot. His form works for HIM.

 Watch yourself on video, practice form up close to the bales with your eyes closed and find what works for you and then repeat it over and over. That's what it takes to become a great instinctive shooter.
Tradgang Charter Member #35

Online Roger Norris

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 3294
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2003, 10:37:00 AM »
By the way, there is no "system" out there that will make you a great shot, always. The best shooters I know are ALWAYS shooting, practicing, working on things like the close target shooting Ray mentioned. And even the great shooters have a bad shot, or a bad day.

 It seems to me, that a shot has stages. The further away from the release stage that you are, the more you can duplicate someone else's form (the beginning of the draw). The closer to the release you are, (the anchor and release), the more personalized it has to be. Fred may release in a split second and anchor at the corner of his mouth. You may hold for 3 seconds and anchor on a tooth. Both can produce a great arrow down range. Does that make sense?
"I think wolves would find me stringy, of high cholesterol, with an Irish whiskey aftertaste"
 www.Tradwoodsman.com  What the heck is an Arrow Canoe?

Offline **DONOTDELETE**

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 10445
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2003, 11:18:00 AM »
Dave Bulla,
Your comments echo my experiences, I really respect "Fred Asbell" but can't seem to do it "his way"!

Offline joel smith

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 1200
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2003, 12:45:00 PM »
I found that Mr. Asbell's recommendation of a high-wristed grip worked very well for me before my joints started giving me so much trouble, especially if the bow's shape allowed me to just touch my index fingertip to the tip of my thumb. As my joints have gotten worse and my strength gone with them (hard to work out when you blow your elbow every time) I find it hard to shoot high wrist and now have to "heel" the bow to pull hunting weight bows. It's been a big adjustment for me and my accuracy is still not what I'd like it to be, nowhere near what it was when I shot "Asbell" style--I really think he's right about everything being in line promoting better accuracy
"...some of it's magic, some of it's tragic, but I've had a good life all the way..."
Jimmy Buffet from HE WENT TO PARIS

Offline bayoulongbowman

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 3766
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2003, 12:48:00 PM »
I say if it works for you , use it ...too much movement foe me ....but if it works for you find...Mark#78
"If you're living your life as if there is no GOD, you had  better be right!"

Offline Tedd@work

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 78
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2003, 01:01:00 PM »
I  use the high wrist Asbell, but draw straight back. can't do the swing arm. But everything else is like he recomends. Even get my bows with the thumb groove lower. When I am really humming,accuracy is amazing. ( at least it is to me)Tedd
You never know how much is "enough" until you know how much is "more than enough"

Offline bodkin

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 14
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2003, 04:57:00 PM »
Hi !

A few days ago I met a nother L.B.-shooter at a local club.He shot with an Asbell kind of style that looked more like dart-throwing.He released often too early and sometimes to late-so the arrows went all over the place.He drow the bow while svinging it up-but drow it to anchor before the arrow was pointed at the target.I shoot with a style that remindes of B. Ferguson´s and I´ve got 70 points more when we compered our resolts an a 60cm fita target.(18m)Now this of course does´nt say that one guru´s style is better than the others,but more about the two of us.Asbel´s book and video are grat and containes loads of importend info about shooting style improvemant.Perhapes the fita target face is not so great for praktice becouse one tend to concentrate on the whole target.I´m going to draw a single red cirkel on a white sheet of paper insted.It should be easier to focus on that.It would be interesting to let gurus like Fred and Byron compete against one a nother.I wonder who would win...

b.

Offline George Tsoukalas

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 2646
Re: Asbell style
« Reply #19 on: November 21, 2003, 05:08:00 PM »
I gotta tell you. For once I am at a loss for words.
Jawge

Users currently browsing this topic:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
 

Contact Us | Trad Gang.com © | User Agreement

Copyright 2003 thru 2019 ~ Trad Gang.com ©