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Author Topic: Wood's memory at 200 degree F  (Read 2296 times)

Offline Steve

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Re: Wood's memory at 200 degree F
« Reply #60 on: July 28, 2003, 09:06:00 PM »
Further up this thread someone asked what if a bow were repeatedly heated. I made a 58" osage bow of a thick ringed but lighter density osage, and it would show increasing set with each shooting session. It was parrafined, so I heated and reparrafined that bow probably 1/2 dozen times over it's life. Each time it would straighten right out, and gain probably 6 pounds or so. Much better cast. Unfortunately when in this state it wasn't shooter friendly, and accuracy was a real chore. As the set would creep back, the accuracy came with it. I shot many many arrows from it, and retired it recently due to it showing some minor crysals in an area I didn't do my most dilligent tillering in. all in all, I learned that heating would change the bow's profile, but not nesessarily for the better. Steve

Offline Marc

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Re: Wood's memory at 200 degree F
« Reply #61 on: July 28, 2003, 09:31:00 PM »
Rich
I knew there might be a problem with Bob's bow before I sent it to him and told him about it before hand, with the understanding that I would make it good. I didn't see it until I started to apply the finish but there was a couple of frets on the lower limb at the base of the recurve. I stripped the finish off and ran some crazy glue in the frets in the hopes of curing the problem but I guess the high stress of the design was to much for it. Bob is sending me the bow and if I can't fix it he will get a new one.

I have been heat treating bows for about a year now and everyone I do teaches me more about the process. There is definitely a line between too much heat treating and to little, not a fine line but one none the less. To much and the wood becomes to brittle. To little and it will take more set. To little is better than to much but the right amount can't be beat.

Also. As with any high stress design. The better the piece of wood you start out with the better the end result.

In finishing. When I heat treat a bow I don't just use 200 degrees. I use 400.

The bow is pretty fast for a selfbow isn't it?
Marc

Offline Rich Saffold

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Re: Wood's memory at 200 degree F
« Reply #62 on: July 29, 2003, 12:15:00 AM »
Marc, I didn't know if it was hinging as much from the heat or the heat strengthened the belly up to that point...It was impressive to see it hold at full draw many times  :eek:  ..and I certainly would have left it as is..Ya it rips thats for sure, and especially in that extreme level of mojam humidity..It was a blast to shoot and motivates to make another stout recurve.  :smileystooges:  

That bow was winged elm ?

Offline Marc

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Re: Wood's memory at 200 degree F
« Reply #63 on: July 29, 2003, 05:54:00 AM »
Rich
I wish I had some Winged Elm. I'm sure it would take very well to heat treating. No this was just some better than average White Elm. The one tree of very dense Elm, maybe Rock Elm, that I have been able to find up here was exceptional when heat treated. The only problem is I'm to far north for the really good wood.
Marc

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