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Author Topic: Peter Storm Raingear  (Read 157 times)

Offline J

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Peter Storm Raingear
« on: October 18, 2004, 11:02:00 PM »
Just tried the 300 series no sweat raingear from Peter Storm after reading so many good things about it from other bowhunters.  Only used it 2 days, but so far so good.  One thing is that its louder than I thought it would be.  Its not swooshy sounding like nylon, but more like vinyl material when it rubs and folds. It does not seem as loud when its raining and gets wet.  Overall not bad, but I'd suspect that MTO50 is quieter (and a lot more expensive) when I last checked it out at a Cabela's store.

I used Helly Hansen Impertech in AK, and it seemed softer, quieter, and more stretchy.  But, the Impertech does not breathe at all and you can get soaked in your own sweat.  The Peter Storm 300 Series breathes well, even under a backpack.  There was condensation in the pocket and I believe it was water vapor escaping the first layer of the jacket into the pocket but not going thru the outer layer that the pocket is made from.  The flap on the pocket is very secure so I'm sure it wasn't leaking.  I still hunted for hours and my fleece underneath was completely dry.  I also sat on wet logs and did not get a wet rearend.  Some of the membrane type raingear (Gore-tex and imitators) can sometimes seep water under pressure when sitting down.  Weather was cool, windy, and rainy.  Snow fell briefly, so you get the picture.  I'll try to update this as I use the jacket and pants more, especially in warmer weather.  I think all of these breathable materials work better when there is a good temperature differential between the inside (body) and outside (cold).  It seems that few work really well when its warmer and there's less heat to drive the water out.  Just my guess, and this stuff may prove my theory wrong.

I think Gore-tex and the other membranes are great, but they eventually fail and the outer shell usually uses DWR and if the finish wears out you'll get a leak.  The Peter Storm Material is a polyurethane with a bonded nylon liner.  It reminds me of old school plain-jane raingear with welded seems, but it breathes.  

Things I don't like are that the zipper is on the left side like a ladies jacket!  I don't care what gender my jacket is, but my left hand does not like being responsible for zipper duty.  Paul, the distributer, assures me that the leftsided zipper is normal for mens jackets in most parts of the world.  I also got the dark green color and unfortunately the inside is white!  The camo might be different.  If you're thinking about this raingear, you may want to find out.

Its not fancy, but I'm amazed that it breathes so well for something that seems like it will remain waterproof (barring any punctures) forever unlike membrane raingear.  It also dries quickly.  I like simple funtional things that do not require maintenance, I think this raingear is a great compromise, since nothing is perfect.  Its relatively inexpensive and functional.  I think a fleece under layer is a perfect combination.  The fleece will pull moisture from your body and distribute it to the nylon so it can be moved to the outside of the raingear.

Offline J

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Re: Peter Storm Raingear
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2004, 10:40:00 PM »
This is my second weekend with the Peter Strom raingear.  It was clear and sunny, so i din't need to use it today, but took it along in my pack anyway.  

One thing to note is that the pants roll up to a fairly small size.  The jacket (316 deluxe) takes up more space in the pack.  I have not used Frogg Toggs, but I think they might be more compact if that's what you are looking for.  I also have a $7 pair of nylon wind pants that I soaked in CampDry silicone spray about a year ago and they shed water great and are even more compact than the Peter Storm.  They do have that swooshy sound, but it dimishes once wet.

I wish there was an ultimate answer for raingear, but I don't think it exists.  It may be best to have 2 sets, one set for possible rain (lightweight, packable for potential rainfall) and one for rainy days (ie dedicated raingear that you put on before you hit the trail because its raining).  The later raingear tends to be heavy and bulky and usually takes up an entire pack.  I like the MTO50 from Cabela's but its gotten pricey, so I've never gotten it.  I bought a jacket and pants from Peter Storm for ~$130, shipping included.

Offline J

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Re: Peter Storm Raingear
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2004, 07:00:00 PM »
Update- week 3

I wore the pants today since the forecast called for rain and I figured I might be bushwhacking.  I wore a fleece jacket.  It was middle to low 60's today with some sunshine.

It was definitely too warm to wear the pants.  I wouldn't recommend wearing them unless the temperature is lower, or its raining.  Even when it cooled down my legs were clammy.  My upper body with the fleece top was fine and dry.

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