Author Topic: First time red oak bow  (Read 632 times)

Offline K-Rod93

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First time red oak bow
« on: February 16, 2019, 03:07:41 PM »
I just bought a 1x6 of red oak from a lumber supply house to make a laminate bow and I'm still in the process of making my first bow so I'm new to this craft so my question is how long should I let the lumber dry before I go making a bow from it, seeing how I don't know how dry it is? I plan on making it 64" and using bocote for the handle and hickory and stablecore from 3rivers for the backing.

Online KenH

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2019, 04:17:36 PM »
Lumberyard wood is already kiln dried.  No need for additional drying. 

You're making a Tri-lam bow.  Back-Core-Belly.   The Hickory is the Back.  Stabilcore is the Core, replacing the usual wood core.  Oak is the Belly.  I don't think that Oak, by itself, will stand the strains of compression from those materials.

Let the Tri-lam builders chime in on this! 
« Last Edit: February 16, 2019, 04:33:57 PM by KenH »
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Online Pat B

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2019, 05:45:50 PM »
I would let it sit a week or 2 before working it so the M/C has time to equalize with your local environment. I've had lumber warp if I didn't allow it to equalize first before sawing it.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!
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Offline Wolftrail

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2019, 06:07:56 PM »
There is so much better wood than RO.   White Oak is really misunderstood and better than RO.  Its right up the with hickory in tension.  But then again RO is doable many bowyers used it for their first bows.  I use Eastern maple or yew because its cheap and readily available.  Core wood I use black walnut, white oak, or cherry in wood bows.

Online Roy from Pa

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2019, 06:53:33 PM »
How about a picture of the oak board?

And the hickory backing?
« Last Edit: February 16, 2019, 07:29:41 PM by Roy from Pa »

Offline K-Rod93

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2019, 07:40:21 PM »
Ok will take a picture tomorrow of the oak board but to me it looks pretty good free of knots and decent grain. I haven't ordered the other materials yet as I'm working on another bow now. Since I needed lumber to make a tillering tree I figured I'd get the red oak now to give it some time to dry. So you don't think the bow will last very long? I only got the idea because I saw somebody on YouTube make a similar bow from red oak minus the core lam

Online Roy from Pa

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2019, 07:46:40 PM »
Read this link, it will guide you through a board bow build..

http://www.tradgang.com/tgsmf/index.php?topic=108949.0

Read this link and make yourself a Gizmo tool.

http://www.tradgang.com/tgsmf/index.php?topic=108906.0
« Last Edit: February 16, 2019, 07:56:48 PM by Roy from Pa »

Online KenH

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2019, 11:18:53 PM »
It's called a "core lam" because it is supposed to be the Core of the bow, not backing.  A hickory backed board bow with something for the handle is just fine.  The StabilCore makes things completely different.
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Offline K-Rod93

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2019, 11:02:12 AM »
Would the carbon core lam be good for this type of bow? I would have though it would have added to the durability and give a longer life to the bow while adding performance. Thanks I'll definitely read that article and I've heard of the gizmo tool I'll have to make one

Online KenH

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2019, 11:31:32 AM »
" I would have though it would have added to the durability and give a longer life to the bow while adding performance."

Yes -- as a CORE.  Not as a random lamination stuck in a stack.  3/4" Oak is more "powerful" than a .040 lamn of StabilCore.  What you're describing to build is a primarily Red Oak bow with two back lams, not a tri-lam with StabilCore for the middle, Hickory on the back and Red Oak for the belly -- the proportions are all wrong.
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Offline K-Rod93

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2019, 11:38:04 AM »
So long story short just stick to the red oak belly and hickory back? I don't want to over complicate things I just want to build a simple bow to hunt with that won't break. Thanks for all the help this is something I always wanted to get into and do this for a long time

Online Pat B

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2019, 11:51:23 AM »
I've made a few hickory backed red oak bows over the years. One in particular was a 66" pyramid(2 1/2" to 3/8")bow that I allowed anyone to shoot it and never restricted the draw length just to see how bullet proof it is. That bow is still in good shape and still shoots well and holds a slight bit or reflex. This bow is about as durable as it can get.
Not even carbon fiber material will hold together a fatally flawed bow. If you are considerate in your selection of the woods used there is no reason it shouldn't be reliable.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!
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Online KenH

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2019, 02:21:20 PM »
Yep -- K.I.S.S.  Hickory backed Red Oak is just fine.  There's no guarantee that a bow won't break on you, ever.  But as Pat tells you, RO & Hickory a very durable combination if the grain of the Oak is good and the glue job is done right.    Especially for a first bow.
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Online Possum Head

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2019, 09:09:58 PM »
I’ve got two Hickory backed RO bows that were among my first builds. They are both light and popular with my Grandkids. I used Walnut in the riser section as well as tips. Enjoy your journey 👍

Offline Kingstaken

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2019, 11:39:06 AM »
KJ any pics yet?
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Offline K-Rod93

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2019, 04:57:19 PM »
The grain was no good on the red oak i bought but I have pictures of the bamboo backed Osage bow with a bubinga riser. I need to figure out how I'm going to make a tillering tree that I can take down easily so I hit a bump in the road. I'm going to see how I can post the pictures up now

Online Pat B

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Re: First time red oak bow
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2019, 10:36:08 AM »
You not only have to look at the grain on the back of the board you also have to consider the grain along the side of the  board.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!
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