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Author Topic: Why is my point on at almost every distance?  (Read 831 times)

Offline Tedd

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Why is my point on at almost every distance?
« on: January 15, 2019, 10:21:48 PM »
Since deer season ended I am trying to be more of a gap shooter to improve accuracy. (Normaly I use the arrow for left and right but not for elevation). I have tried to gap shoot many times and also tried fixed crawl. I run into the same 2 problems every time.
  1 - I struggle to be able to see the end of the arrow.
  2 -  My point on is pretty much 0 to 30 yards. Or so it seems to me. And everything I read tells me I should be holding below the target.
  I think the point on at all those distances is really lucky because it's pretty much like a sight pin. That is if I can gain focus on the point enough to know it's on. I am finding at times that it is incredibly accurate and I plan to stick with it.
  Why doesn't my point have to be lower than the intended target like everyone else? I shoot split finger have a 30" draw with my current arrows that are 31 3/4" to the end of the outsert. The bow is 61@30". It's no faster than anyone else bow. My arrows are 670 grains. Is the long arrow the reason? If that is the case, do shooters intentionally use long arrows to reduce gap?
 How well can you focus on the tip of the arrow? I think I am fixing my vision on the end of the shaft and not the point. Is that the correct way? When screwing on a broad-head I'm still aiming the end of the shaft. It think!
  I am used to keeping both eyes open when shooting. I seem to be able to focus better on the point with a squint or close my left eye.
 When shooting tonight my first few were a little wild because it's new for me. I couldn't get the point on the target and see it correctly, my mind wants to revert to instinctive. Then once I got things lined up better I shot about 20-30 arrows that were so accurate that it convinces me I need to learn gap shooting better.
  Anyone else have a point on that covers that kind of distance? Anyone else struggle to see the end of the arrow?
Thanks,
Tedd
 

Online McDave

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Re: Why is my point on at almost every distance?
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2019, 11:15:27 PM »
To gap shoot you should not be focused on the arrow or the arrow point.  You should be focused on the spot you want to hit, with the arrow or the arrow point in your out of focus peripheral vision.  If your focus shifts to the arrow or the arrow point, you should let down and start again.  It does not really matter if you can see the arrow point or not.  If you can't see the point, use the furtherest point you can on the arrow shaft to aim the shot.  As long as that is consistent, it should be accurate.  I think from your description, you are using a very high anchor point, which is probably why you can’t see the arrow point.

Normally, the longer the arrow, the closer the point on. However, if your arrow nock is right up by your eye, that would sort of negate the effect of arrow length, because all of the arrow length would be compressed in your vision to an insignificant length, which probably also explains why you seem to have a variable point on distance. Normally, there is only one point on distance for any given setup.

Your setup is so far out of the norm that I really can’t help you, except to try and describe what is going on.  If you are happy with it, fine.  If you want a more typical setup, pick an anchor that is low enough so that you can see the point of the arrow, and then don’t focus on it.  I once shot against someone in a tournament who was using a high anchor like that, and since he was beating me, I tried to duplicate it.  But I never could get any good at it, so I want back to the usual anchor for gap shooting, which is low enough so that you can see the arrow point.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2019, 09:42:11 AM by McDave »
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Online YosemiteSam

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Re: Why is my point on at almost every distance?
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2019, 03:28:21 PM »
Seems odd.  But if that's what you have, I wouldn't mess with it.
"A good hunter...that's somebody the animals COME to."
"Every animal knows way more than you do." -- by a Koyukon hunter, as quoted by R. Nelson.

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Re: Why is my point on at almost every distance?
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2019, 06:45:05 AM »
An excellent detailed response McDave...
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Macatawa

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Re: Why is my point on at almost every distance?
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2019, 01:44:00 PM »
To gap shoot you should not be focused on the arrow or the arrow point.  You should be focused on the spot you want to hit, with the arrow or the arrow point in your out of focus peripheral vision.  If your focus shifts to the arrow or the arrow point, you should let down and start again.  It does not really matter if you can see the arrow point or not.  If you can't see the point, use the furtherest point you can on the arrow shaft to aim the shot.  As long as that is consistent, it should be accurate.  I think from your description, you are using a very high anchor point, which is probably why you can’t see the arrow point.

Normally, the longer the arrow, the closer the point on. However, if your arrow nock is right up by your eye, that would sort of negate the effect of arrow length, because all of the arrow length would be compressed in your vision to an insignificant length, which probably also explains why you seem to have a variable point on distance. Normally, there is only one point on distance for any given setup.

Your setup is so far out of the norm that I really can’t help you, except to try and describe what is going on.  If you are happy with it, fine.  If you want a more typical setup, pick an anchor that is low enough so that you can see the point of the arrow, and then don’t focus on it.  I once shot against someone in a tournament who was using a high anchor like that, and since he was beating me, I tried to duplicate it.  But I never could get any good at it, so I want back to the usual anchor for gap shooting, which is low enough so that you can see the arrow point.


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Offline Porkchop1

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Re: Why is my point on at almost every distance?
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2019, 05:53:22 PM »
To gap shoot you should not be focused on the arrow or the arrow point.  You should be focused on the spot you want to hit, with the arrow or the arrow point in your out of focus peripheral vision.  If your focus shifts to the arrow or the arrow point, you should let down and start again.  It does not really matter if you can see the arrow point or not.  If you can't see the point, use the furtherest point you can on the arrow shaft to aim the shot.  As long as that is consistent, it should be accurate.  I think from your description, you are using a very high anchor point, which is probably why you can’t see the arrow point.

Normally, the longer the arrow, the closer the point on. However, if your arrow nock is right up by your eye, that would sort of negate the effect of arrow length, because all of the arrow length would be compressed in your vision to an insignificant length, which probably also explains why you seem to have a variable point on distance. Normally, there is only one point on distance for any given setup.

Your setup is so far out of the norm that I really can’t help you, except to try and describe what is going on.  If you are happy with it, fine.  If you want a more typical setup, pick an anchor that is low enough so that you can see the point of the arrow, and then don’t focus on it.  I once shot against someone in a tournament who was using a high anchor like that, and since he was beating me, I tried to duplicate it.  But I never could get any good at it, so I want back to the usual anchor for gap shooting, which is low enough so that you can see the arrow point.

Isn't what you're explaining Split Vision? I thought "gap" shooting was using the arrow point the same as a sight pin.  I'm so confused with the definitions.
Porkchop

Online McDave

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Re: Why is my point on at almost every distance?
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2019, 08:39:06 PM »
Split vision and gap grow from the same tree, and then branch off in different directions.  Both use the point of the arrow to aim, both focus on the target with the arrow point in your out of focus peripheral vision, and both aim by placing the arrow point above, on, or below the point you want to hit, depending on the distance.

The difference is that gaps are calculated, based on your estimate of the distance to the target, and a chart you have either written down or have in your head of the gaps required for any particular distance.  You estimate the distance to be 30 yards, and you look at your chart, which says to put the arrow point 6” below the spot for 30 yards.  You put the arrow point there and shoot your shot.

In split vision, you don't have a chart or calculate anything.  You shoot many shots until you have a feeling for where the arrow point ought to go for any particular distance.  You don't estimate the distance; you just have a feeling for that too.  So you look at your target and say, hmm, looks like the arrow point should go THERE.  You put it there and shoot your shot.

Split vision is in between instinctive and gap.  In instinctive, you don't put the arrow point on anything.  You just focus on the target, pull back the bow, and let your hand eye coordination take care of the rest.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2019, 08:45:35 PM by McDave »
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Would someone please make up my mind for me?

Offline Porkchop1

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Re: Why is my point on at almost every distance?
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2019, 09:42:51 AM »
Thanks for the explanation McDave!  I think I get it now...
Porkchop

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