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Author Topic: Black eagle vintage  (Read 976 times)

Offline Jessebeaux

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Black eagle vintage
« on: June 24, 2018, 02:52:39 AM »
Ordered some Black Eagle Vintage full length shafts (34") in order to play with reducing my gaps.

Should I try to tune at full length or at least cut  them down some? I draw to 28".
2018 Bodnik Slick Stick 60" 45#
2017 Bodnik Slick Stick 58" 45#
2009 Martin Savannah 62" 50#
2015 Samick Sage 62" 40#
1968 Bear Grizzly 56" 50#
Osage Self Bow 66" 45#
2010 PSE Mustang 60" 45#

Online Jim Casto Jr

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Re: Black eagle vintage
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2018, 07:11:08 AM »
Length helps a little in reducing gaps; raising the nocking point, shooting a lighter bow, or heavier arrow will help more.

I shoot mine full length.  I don't see any need to cut them unless I need to make the arrow act stiffer.

"Archery is really very simple. You just have to do the exact same thing on every shot."
Bill Leslie, July 22, 2017

"Form is everything." 
Al Cole, June 7, 2008

Offline the rifleman

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Re: Black eagle vintage
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2018, 07:28:02 PM »
I never cut a carbon arrow before shooting bareshaft w the point weight i want.  I am hoping the arrow will show weak initially so i can tune by cutting.  I go 1/4" at a time and take my time---days usually, tuning only when im fresh.  A longer arrow will help greatly in reducing your point on distance.

Online McDave

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Re: Black eagle vintage
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2018, 08:32:46 PM »
Jason Wesbrock has an interesting article about using a higher anchor to reduce gaps in the current issue of TBM.  In my experience, this has more affect on gaps than anything other than a fixed crawl, and avoids having to separate your string hand from the arrow.  If you look carefully, you will see that not only does he have a higher anchor, but he also tilts his head down so the string hits his eyebrow, further reducing the distance between his eye and the arrow.  Conventional wisdom is not to move your head, but certainly works well for Jason, and FWIW, it works great for me too.
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Offline the rifleman

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Re: Black eagle vintage
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2018, 09:02:35 PM »
McDave--- i agree with what youre saying.  In my case, tilting my head lead me into form trouble--- Arne noted that my head was never in the same place twice.  Ive since been careful to hold my head straight up and consistency has been great.  I do need a longer arrow and a crawl as i am an aimer.  I tried higher anchors, but index in corner of my mouth is about as high as i can go and still get good back tension.
Arne, would tucking my chin to get eye closer to arrow be ill advised from a form standpoint?  I am happy w my form now but tighter gaps would be great too...

Online McDave

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Re: Black eagle vintage
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2018, 09:11:18 PM »
In my case, tilting my head actually increased my consistency while reducing my gaps.  With my old aged droop, my head tilts down naturally anyway, and when I try to hold it straight up, it really isn’t in the same place from shot to shot.  When I tilt my head so that my eyebrow meets the string, I get a consistent head position.  The first I heard of this was an old article by Jim Ploen, a champion trad shooter from a generation or so ago, who recommended tilting your head, which I kind of ignored, but kept in the back of my mind.  When I saw that Jason Wesbrock does the same thing, I decided to try it myself.
TGMM Family of the Bow

Would someone please make up my mind for me?

Online moebow

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Re: Black eagle vintage
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2018, 09:27:46 PM »
By "the book" yes, tucking the chin down to meet or get closer to the string not recommended.  BUT, as Dave points out that MAY be a solution for you. It would bring the arrow nock closer to your line of sight thus reducing the gap.  I really would not have a problem with a shooter making that kind of adjustment especially AFTER they have gotten too a repeatable form and solid execution.  That is the time to start adjusting what you are doing (aiming technique) to the "game" you are playing.

Just be sure to keep the form and execution in mind as you "adjust".  Adjusting what you do (form wise) to accommodate an aiming technique CAN potentially lead you to loosing or screwing up your shot execution.  Just be careful as you experiment is all I'm trying to say.

Arne
11 H Hill bows
3 David Miller bows
4 James Berry bows
USA Archery, Level 4 NTS Coach

Are you willing to give up what you are; to become what you could be?

Offline the rifleman

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Re: Black eagle vintage
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2018, 09:35:05 PM »
Thanks Arne.  I am hesitant to vary too much, as this has been working for me by using a crawl.  I have noticed that my arrows were showing weaker--- a very good sign that my draw length had increased as a result of properly getting in to my back.  I really appreciate the coaching--- it has definitely improved my accuracy and confidence-- i won my first 3d shoot last weekend.  Thanks again.

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