INFO: Trad Archery for Bowhunters



Author Topic: Snap shooting vs anchor point  (Read 1988 times)

Offline Aaron Proffitt

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 76
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #40 on: September 11, 2006, 11:03:00 PM »
My gawd,
  some people can make shooting a bow complicated !!
   If it;s so complicated, might as well shoot a wheelie !!
"First thing we do,let's kill all the lawyers".
Shakespeare Henry VI, Part 2

Does an agnostic,dyslexic,insomniac lie awake at night wondering if there really is a Dog ?

Offline justin snyder

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 12
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #41 on: September 12, 2006, 01:22:00 PM »
Its kind of funny the set ways we get to believing.  I watched Fred Asbell's video this week end and he admits to not realy anchoring when shooting. He practices his ancor a few times without shooting just to remember were it is, then shoots without stopping to anchor. It dont apear that his hand ever touches his mouth when shooting. So I guess we all have to admit you can be a good shooter without stopping to anchor. Justin

Offline Ray Hammond

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 5826
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #42 on: September 12, 2006, 04:07:00 PM »
Doc,
There are reasons for NOT shooting at game out much past 20 yards that have NOTHING to do with your accuracy...there is a very large difference between a foam target and a live animal and it makes no difference if you are a struggling new bowhunter, or Rick Welch.

Interesting discussion.
“Courageous, untroubled, mocking and violent-that is what Wisdom wants us to be. Wisdom is a woman, and loves only a warrior.” - Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Les in Israel

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 3
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #43 on: September 12, 2006, 05:05:00 PM »
Greetings Terry. I appreciate the thoughts and the welcome. We are heading home for Tennessee in a week. Where are you in GA?

Offline GroundHunter

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 118
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #44 on: September 12, 2006, 07:41:00 PM »
It ain't complicated. It's just complicated to explain.
GroundHunter
Mom taught me: "Can't never could and won't never will"

HH Wesley Spl. 66" 85#@28
HH Black Bear. 66" 73#@28
Instinctive shooter, like wood arrows. Stalk & still hunt.
Dream: wingshooting ducks and quail

Online Terry Green

  • Administrator
  • Trad Bowhunter
  • ****
  • Posts: 21570
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #45 on: September 13, 2006, 08:55:00 AM »
"Snap shooting vs anchor point"

Guys....gotta stay on topic.

Thanks.
tarz@tradgang.com

"It's important,  when going after a goal, to never lose sight of the integrity of the journey" - Andy Garcia

' An anchor point is not a destination, its  an evolution to execution' - Me



Black Powder Gang  ~   Loop Addictions

Offline GroundHunter

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 118
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #46 on: September 16, 2006, 12:23:00 AM »
Swing-draw, release on anchor, a "floating" feel to the whole draw, like drawing a line with constant, push-pull tension, no real focus on the anchor. More 'touch and go" or get there and release. With a total focus on the spot I want to hit.

I guess some call it snap-shooting. But I think of it as a form. Brunner's Instinctive Shooting" video. Schultz's Hitting "Em Like Howard Hill". I been practicing that way, and putting in ideas from this forum - Rod's back tension advice and the deep hook, relaxed release. if I can do it consistently, I'll be happy.

Got it right last night in 16 yard form practice.
   

33/32nds inch group.
GroundHunter
Mom taught me: "Can't never could and won't never will"

HH Wesley Spl. 66" 85#@28
HH Black Bear. 66" 73#@28
Instinctive shooter, like wood arrows. Stalk & still hunt.
Dream: wingshooting ducks and quail

Offline GroundHunter

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 118
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #47 on: September 16, 2006, 09:04:00 AM »
Rythm. I went out this morning, and I coundn't have got my first few groups into the veiwfinder. Soooo bad.

So  focused on the feel, and the part I was missing was the rythm of the shot sequence. I was concentrating on each component of the form as I went through it. Sort of stopping and checking mentally. So, I relaxed and repeated the shots in the usual rythm. Boom, groups on target and tight.

Form-Focus-Rythm.

I remember Dick Palmer's book on shooting the longbow stressed this. I also remember missing all the deer I drew real slow on to avoid spooking 'em.

Good shooting!
GroundHunter
Mom taught me: "Can't never could and won't never will"

HH Wesley Spl. 66" 85#@28
HH Black Bear. 66" 73#@28
Instinctive shooter, like wood arrows. Stalk & still hunt.
Dream: wingshooting ducks and quail

Offline poekoelan

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 173
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #48 on: September 29, 2006, 12:06:00 PM »
One other possibility. Not sure if anyone brought this up already, but since I only scanned through 4 pages of threads, it's possible.

Anyhow....Maybe a corner of the mouth anchor is wrong for you. Maybe by using the corner of your mouth, you are not pulling exactly straight back or not getting the arrow directly under your vision. But when you don't use an anchor point, you may be pulling straight back and getting the arrow under your vision.

I found out long time ago that I need to anchor more to the front of my mouth. This put the arrow directly under my line of sight. We are all built differently and the corner of the mouth might not be right for everyone.

Just a thought.

Offline GroundHunter

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 118
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #49 on: October 01, 2006, 05:24:00 PM »
Rod Jenkins talks about drawing a good line, and picking an anchor point that is on that line.

Now as far as the value of a fixed anchor point for accuracy and consistency is concerned, I have forund it is largely irrelevant at 30 yards or less, for hunting accuracy - hitting say, a tennis ball. Flies in the face of reason, but it's true - or it's in the puddin' I've been stirring. John Schultz said it in "Hitting 'Em Like Howard Hill". Said you can be more accurate shooting quickly, than slow - recommended release on anchor. Watching him, and his teenage son shoot dimes and aspirins in the air, there is no set achor on these shots. Schultz says you can release anywhere along the line. Says it. Watch Byron Ferguson shoot tossed aspirins, or tossed anything. Not realizing he/they were wrong about this, I tried it. Tried it all: anchor and hold /release on anchor / release on "line" with no set anchor point. Got 1" groups at 16 yards, and hit the tennis ball at 20-30 yards. I'm not shooting for IBO championship. Just want to hit the kill-zone hunting.

Do not try this if you don't want to. My goal is to hit what I'm shooting at in hunting condtions - game at varying distances, little time to draw-shoot, game likely moving.

So, the funny results I get are swing-draw release on the line pretty much anywhere along a 2 inch past adequate draw lenghth for power, and I hit dead on (tennis ball)regularly, 5" circle kill zone easily out to 30-40 yards. Spooky.

The point is not about how everyone should shoot. The point is, the elements of hunting accuracy and effectiveness are more the line and form, concentrating on the spot, and pulling through the shot (keeps it all lined up) and follow-through. A smooth, natural, relaxed, rythmic shot (HH Vieos). It works, wonders.

Now, for guys who want to keep all their hunting shots within 20 yards, the release point only has to be on the draw line, and far enough back in the draw for adequate power. At that distance, nearly all bows shoot flat enough so an inch of short/over draw won't make enough difference to miss by an inch. My basic anchor on the mouth draw is 27". But, I can pull to the ear on my 58# Tomahawk and hit the same spot at 15-20 yards. Elevation of the anchor point, does matter, as over/under elevation takes you out of the line. Same for side-cast in the drawhand.

And, it's not snap-shooting. It's a very precise, practiced form: swing-draw, release along the line, pulling through the release, and holding the bowarm on trget for follow-through. But, it's real smooth and relaxed and shockingly accurate.

Try it, see if you like it. It may be a revelation. Worst case, it'll show you the form elements you need to have in a fixed anchor form.

I'm just sharing what I've found, trying to do this. I do not consider myself a good shot. My younger brother is the good shot.
GroundHunter
Mom taught me: "Can't never could and won't never will"

HH Wesley Spl. 66" 85#@28
HH Black Bear. 66" 73#@28
Instinctive shooter, like wood arrows. Stalk & still hunt.
Dream: wingshooting ducks and quail

Offline MBurns

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 2
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #50 on: October 01, 2006, 08:19:00 PM »
Exactly.

Offline Flathead Willie

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 44
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #51 on: October 03, 2006, 03:55:00 AM »
I guess I'm a snap shooter but it works real well for me. I never hold an anchor point and a shot rarely takes 2 seconds. I think it's kind of Zen shooting. I just concentrate on the spot I want to hit and somehow the arrow goes there.
Some people climb to the top of the ladder only to find that it is leaning on the wrong wall!

Offline GroundHunter

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 118
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #52 on: October 03, 2006, 05:36:00 PM »
Zen, by all means, do it that way!
GroundHunter
Mom taught me: "Can't never could and won't never will"

HH Wesley Spl. 66" 85#@28
HH Black Bear. 66" 73#@28
Instinctive shooter, like wood arrows. Stalk & still hunt.
Dream: wingshooting ducks and quail

Offline Pete Darby

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 124
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #53 on: October 05, 2006, 08:05:00 AM »
Excellent discussion.  I can agree with almost eveyone on hear.  It would seem to me that many are looking at the elephant through a knothole and reaching a very logical conclusion from a very limited view. While I don't claim to look at the whole elephant, I have looked through a lot of different knotholes.   For me what has worked is to realize that any anchor on my face is a bad thing (however anyone watching me would say I always anchor on my face) I however, anchor my face on my hand and use my true anchor of one line from my elbow to the tip of the arrow with back tension. This also makes it hard to pluck since you didn't anchor your hand and don't have to pull it away.  When I am doing it right an observer might say I am holding at anchor, but I actually almost never do since that pretty much strips off much of your arrow speed and makes it easy to creep.  I had been putting together my longbow style when I had an old longbow shooter give me the secret to shooting fast accurately. It was amazing he can appear to hold forever yet never really hold.  One last point; every archery book I have read deals with the shot sequence. It starts with stance then goes into drawing etc.  Does it make sense to build up a smooth shootig sequence only to freeze then spring into your release.  I would equate that to the tennis player waiting on the serve who just stands there versus the one who sets up a weaving rythmn so that when he has to move he is already moving.  Its an inertia thing.
Pete Darby

Offline GroundHunter

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 118
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #54 on: October 05, 2006, 11:48:00 PM »
Well said, Pete! You really captured the concept of the "line" in your description. I've often felt using the word "anchor" diverted me to a "set" sort of hold early on. When I stumbled onto the fluid, dynamic tension of the line - got the "feel" and saw the sudden accuracy, it started making sense. Great description!
GroundHunter
Mom taught me: "Can't never could and won't never will"

HH Wesley Spl. 66" 85#@28
HH Black Bear. 66" 73#@28
Instinctive shooter, like wood arrows. Stalk & still hunt.
Dream: wingshooting ducks and quail

Offline Big_Jimmy

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 4
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #55 on: October 07, 2006, 05:27:00 PM »
It all good if U 'Snap shoot' or solid anchor as long as its in line and consistent. If you snap shoot and are within an imaginary anchor point by 1/2 an inch or so and come to draw about 1/2 less or more I don't see much diff at 20 yards or so. Your floating U'r anchor but still in line enough to be fast and in the kill zone. By the way I anchor but have snap shot in the past.

Offline bayoulongbowman

  • Trad Bowhunter
  • **
  • Posts: 3765
Re: Snap shooting vs anchor point
« Reply #56 on: October 07, 2006, 08:15:00 PM »
I dont care what method one uses, just find one that works for you , period...having said that , I use check points parts of my body as I draw to stay on line with my feather and the arrow. Most of the snap shooters Ive seen seem simply over bowed to me...dont get me wrong Im sure there is a few snap shooter that shoot lights out, I once saw a Indian draw to his chest and hit ping pong balls from 25 yds. ...bottom line what ever metod that works for you practice, practice then practice some more...kneeing sitting , all postions ...good luck! God Bless...mark#78   :wavey:
"If you're living your life as if there is no GOD, you had  better be right!"

Users currently browsing this topic:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
 

Contact Us | Trad Gang.com © | User Agreement

Copyright 2003 thru 2019 ~ Trad Gang.com ©